HARRY T HARRISON
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HONORED ON PANEL 30W, LINE 23 OF THE WALL

HARRY TODD HARRISON

WALL NAME

HARRY T HARRISON

PANEL / LINE

30W/23

DATE OF BIRTH

12/13/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

VINH LONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/03/1969

HOME OF RECORD

MADRID

COUNTY OF RECORD

Boone County

STATE

IA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

1LT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR HARRY TODD HARRISON
POSTED ON 4.10.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Lt Harry Harrison,
Thank you for your service as a Field Artillery Commander. It is Lent, which is a time of preparation. The war was years ago, but we all need to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 12.20.2016
POSTED BY: Carolyn (Harrison) McClanahan

A young wife remembers:

Todd and I were married 10/07/1969 after his graduation from OCS in Lawton, OK. We were then stationed at Ft Leonard Wood, MO. It was tough living on a 2LT pay of $250/mo but we survived. I will always remember Todd as energetic, fun-loving and loyal to his wife, family and friends. He wanted to be an Oceanographer which seemed strange since he came from rural Iowa. He was stationed TDY in Monterey, CA and loved the ocean. So many terrific young men and women lost their lives in Vietnam but we can hold them in our memories and thank God for the short time we had them with us.
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POSTED ON 10.12.2015
POSTED BY: Linda (Polich)Benson

Madrid Class of 1965

Todd was a member of the Madrid Iowa Class of 1965. A memorial by the class is an American Flag at Madrid High School Football field. Todd is still in the hearts of many of us.

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POSTED ON 1.19.2015

Final Mission of 1LT Harry T. Harrison

On March 3, 1969, a U.S. Army helicopter UH-1H (tail number 67-17287) was involved in an accident while attempting a takeoff. The pilot, WO1 Cunning, decided to make a hover check before attempting the takeoff. He pulled up to about a three foot hover and the RPM bled down to 6400. Also the aircraft went IFR. Cunning then set the aircraft down and told his crew chief and gunner to off load about 200 pounds of cargo. They actually off loaded about 290 pounds of cargo. Cunning then picked up the aircraft, made a 180 degrees pedal turn and hovered away from the wires approximately 180 feet. The aircraft bled off to 6400 RPM as Cunning hovered what he thought was downwind. Actually he was hovering into a quartering headwind. He was engulfed in dust as he hovered back. He then did a 180 degrees pedal turn again and immediately took off from a three foot hover. The takeoff was normal with extra power pulled in to reach translational lift as early as possible. Upon initiating his takeoff, Cunning had the wires in sight. However, as he began moving forward, back toward the road, the dust caused him to lose sight of the wires. When he did break above the dust he saw the wires directly to his front. He immediately applied aft cyclic for a cyclic climb and pulled up his remaining collective. He cleared the first set of wires by about 5 feet. He continued to hold what he had so as to clear the second set of wires about 50 feet away. At this point he was about 50 feet in the air with maximum or near maximum collective, slow airspeed and an RPM somewhere between 5000 and 5400. For accident investigation purposes, Cunning had now taken the aircraft beyond the point of where an uneventful landing could have been made. Cunning realized that the takeoff had to be aborted and he decided to try for the rice paddy approximately 200 yards to his front and just beyond some buildings. In doing this he passed over about 150 yards of open field which contained two more sets of wires running perpendicular to his route of flight. Cunning's reason for not immediately aborting the takeoff and attempting a running landing to the dirt field was that he was afraid of the wires. He then turned slightly to the left to try and fly through and opening between the two main buildings. He was no longer able to hold his altitude and as he flew thru the opening he had two severe blade strikes on the wall of the right (east) building. The aircraft was then turned 90 degrees to the right and it rolled 90 degrees over on its left side. It landed in that position, its nose 90 degrees from its original route of flight. The cargo compartment landed directly over a drainage ditch. Two of the dead men were found partially submerged in water in the ditch. SP4 Weyman T. Cook, the gunner, sitting on the right side was apparently unhurt at impact, exited the aircraft immediately after it hit. He moved a few feet clear of the crash but then turned back to the aircraft to help the other passengers. At this point there was apparently a fuel explosion with SP4 Cook facing the blast. He had his flight helmet off and his face was unprotected. Both the aircraft commander and the pilot were in their seats when the fuel exploded. However, they were effectively protected by their armored seats. WO 1Cunning and WO1 Winchell then cleared the aircraft, Winchell going through the front windshield and Cunning out the right door. MAJ Darryl E. McCartney and SP4 Cook were the only others to get out of the aircraft, their clothes in flames. However, both later succumbed to their injuries. Five other personnel were trapped in the aircraft. They included the crew chief SP4 Steven M. Hickman, and passengers 2LT Michael D. Sams, SP4 Wayne W. Teeple, 1LT Harry T. Harrison, and SP4 George M. Binns. All died of burn-related injuries. [Taken from vhpa.org]
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POSTED ON 2.21.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear 1LT Harry Todd Harrison, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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