WILMER N GRUBB
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HONORED ON PANEL 4E, LINE 97 OF THE WALL

WILMER NEWLIN GRUBB

WALL NAME

WILMER N GRUBB

PANEL / LINE

4E/97

DATE OF BIRTH

08/14/1932

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

01/26/1966

HOME OF RECORD

ALDAN

COUNTY OF RECORD

Delaware County

STATE

PA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

LTC

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILMER NEWLIN GRUBB
POSTED ON 1.5.2006
POSTED BY: CLAY MARSTON

EVELYN FOWLER GRUBB - LEADER OF A GROUP SUPPORTING POW's DIES AT AGE 74



EVELYN FOWLER GRUBB

LEADER OF A GROUP SUPPORTING

PRISONERS OF WAR

DIES AT AGE 74


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

4 January 2006

MELBOURNE, Florida, 3 January 2005 (AP) -

Evelyn Fowler Grubb, who worked to gain recognition for prisoners of war after her husband, a United States Air Force pilot, was shot down and captured in North Vietnam in 1966, died on 28 December at her home here. She was 74.

The cause was breast cancer, her family said.

Ms. Grubb initially received little information from federal officials after her husband, Captain Wilmer Newlin Grubb, disappeared.

She then approached other wives facing similar situations, forming groups that eventually became the National League of P.O.W. / M.I.A. Families.

Ms. Grubb was the league's national coordinator in Washington in 1971 and 1972.

"She went from being a stay-at-home mom who was growing increasingly frustrated over the lack of publicity about P.O.W.s to becoming a dynamo who headed a national organization and had regular meetings with presidents and heads of state," said her oldest son, Jeffrey.

A photograph of Ms. Grubb's husband was released by his captors as an example of "humane" treatment of American prisoners of war.

After eight years of hoping to be reunited with her husband, Ms. Grubb learned that he had died shortly after his capture. The North Vietnamese said he died from injuries suffered while being shot down, but Ms. Grubb believed he was probably tortured to death.

Ms. Grubb and her organization also urged that the bodies of prisoners who died in captivity be returned to their families.

Her husband's remains were finally returned to the United States in 1974 and interred in Arlington National Cemetery.

A native of Pittsburgh, Ms. Grubb moved to Melbourne in 1977.

She recently completed work on a book with the writer Carol Jose about her experiences with the organization for P.O.W. families.

Ms. Grubb is survived by four sons and several grandchildren.

Wilmer Newlin Grubb was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the time he was carried as being Missing In Action / Prisoner Of War.



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POSTED ON 12.31.2005
POSTED BY: Dave Avery

Who Shall We Send

"An God said who shall we send.I answered I am here,send me."

Isaiah 6:8

Facta Non Verba
Laus Deo
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POSTED ON 12.1.2005
POSTED BY: Bob Ross

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Frye – 1932

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POSTED ON 10.18.2004
POSTED BY: Arnold M. Huskins

An American hero

Taken from the website:

http://www.lansdownecivic.com/Pages/newsletters/2001f/2001f.html
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POSTED ON 11.10.2003
POSTED BY: Katie Kirk

POW bracelet

I too, wore a bracelet for Lt. Col. Grubb for many years. Here is an article and pictures by his buddy Frank Farrell. http://www.lansdownecivic.com/Pages/hometown_stories/photos_captions/7p1_plane.html
I would like to hear from others who wore the bracelet of this fine soldier. Katie
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