JAMES W AYERS
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HONORED ON PANEL 20E, LINE 110 OF THE WALL

JAMES WESTLEY AYERS

WALL NAME

JAMES W AYERS

PANEL / LINE

20E/110

DATE OF BIRTH

10/31/1934

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TIN

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/26/1967

HOME OF RECORD

MONCKS CORNER

COUNTY OF RECORD

Berkeley County

STATE

SC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

CAPT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JAMES WESTLEY AYERS
POSTED ON 4.24.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you....

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. The remembrances posted by those who knew and served under you are truly inspirational. Such a tragic loss.
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POSTED ON 5.17.2020
POSTED BY: Golda

Namesake

He introduced my parents, who have both passed, in return they gave me his middle name. It was touching to read these stories about him. Unfortunately I did not ask my parents enough questions. Am honored to carry on his name.
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POSTED ON 10.31.2019
POSTED BY: Jury Washington

Thank You For Your Service Marine

We can never truly repay the debt we owe our fallen heroes. Semper Fidelis!
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POSTED ON 8.17.2019
POSTED BY: Geoff wright

Mass-2 1966.

When I arrived in Vietnam in 9-66 I was sent to Mass -2.Capt Ayers was the Oic for Comm Hill then.When I arrived at comm hill Capt Ayers came around an introduced himself to me.When does an officer come to visit new enlisted person! He left Mass-2 around March of 1967,as I think he extended his tour to go back to division. I was very sorry to her he was killed after leaving Mass 2.He was a very easy going and pleasant man to be around.
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POSTED ON 8.14.2019
POSTED BY: Rick lopez

Closure

I served with Capt. Ayers in Guantanamo and aboard ship during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Being a enlisted marine, I found Capt. Ayers to be a terrific leader who showed compassion and understanding torwards the marines assigned to his command.
During the CMC, while aboard ship, Capt. Ayers pinned my corporal stripes on me while myself and others marines pinned his captain bars on him.
Before President Kennedy spoke, outlining the “Blockade”, it was our understanding that we were to invade Cuba. Most of the marines began cleaning their equipment with exciteful anticipation.
I felt differently. Having parents both being born in Cuba, being newly married, and only having four months left in my enlistment, I wasn’t thrilled with the situation. I discussed this with Capt. Ayers. Being a truly dedicated marine, he couldn’t understand my hesitancy. We parted no longer friends. I don’t remember ever speaking to him the remaining four months of my enlistment. This misunderstanding bothered me for many years. Then, a few years ago, I learned that Capt. Ayers had been killed in Viet Nam. This haunted me for the next few years. I knew that I wanted to visit his gravesite. This year in June, 2019, I drove from North Carolina to Moncks Corners.
After some local assistance, I found myself sitting in front of Saint Johns Baptist graveyard on Sugar Hill Rd. After some time, I found Captain Ayers’ gravesite. I can not describe the emotions that came over me. But, after some talking and crying, I felt a sense of closure because I came to show my respect for an “Outstanding Marine” and to say “Captain Ayers - you were right!”
Rest In Peace “Captain”,
Corporal Rick Lopez
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