MARSHALL F FRENG
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HONORED ON PANEL 30E, LINE 62 OF THE WALL

MARSHALL FRANKLIN FRENG

WALL NAME

MARSHALL F FRENG

PANEL / LINE

30E/62

DATE OF BIRTH

12/30/1945

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BIEN HOA

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/22/1967

HOME OF RECORD

ELKTON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Cecil County

STATE

MD

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MARSHALL FRANKLIN FRENG
POSTED ON 7.21.2022
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. The remembrances from your high school classmates are moving and reflect their admiration and respect for you. As long as you are remembered you will always be with us….
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POSTED ON 7.19.2022
POSTED BY: MaryAnn Carpenter

Thank You!

Marshall,
In 1969 I was downtown Kalamazoo Michigan joining others to honor those serving in Vietnam.
Bracelets were given out with names of soldiers who were MIA or POW. I was honored to pick the Bracelet with your name.
I found your name on the Memorial Wall.
I carried you in my heart since 1969. I carry you in my heart forever.
I love you!
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POSTED ON 5.24.2020
POSTED BY: Pete Fitzwater

Quiet hero.

I remember Marshall from high school in Elkton, Maryland. He was a smart, caring guy who didn’t just hang out, but he did things. He read a lot, knew about music and history and even things like falconry. R.I.P, hero.
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POSTED ON 10.16.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Marshall Freng,
Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 5.3.2018

Air Loss Over Land

On November 22, 1967, a U.S. Army DeHavilland U-1A Otter (#57-6119) fixed-wing aircraft from the 54th Aviation Company crashed and burned on takeoff from runway east at Long Binh Army Airfield in Bien Hoa Province, RVN. The accident occurred as the Otter was leaving the airstrip when it hit a cable that was strung on a crane next to the runway. The pilot lost control of the plane and crashed. Personnel nearby heard the crash and came running, but the would-be rescuers had trouble approaching the wreck as it was totally engulfed. A total of nine U.S. personnel would die as a result of this accident. SP4 Thomas B. Allen, the crew chief on the flight, died in the crash along with passengers PVT Sheldon D. Bowler, PFC Marshall F. Freng, PFC Steven P. Morse, and PVT Allyson Y. Sasaki. Two other passengers, SP4 Woodrow D. Adler, a courier for Headquarters & Headquarters Company (HHC), 222nd Aviation Battalion, and PFC David L. Tasker, died four days later from burns they suffered in the accident. Military records regarding this incident listed two persons as the pilot of the aircraft. One of them, CW2 David A. Kreitzer, is the probable pilot as he served with the 54th Aviation Company and reportedly flew U-1 Otters during his first tour of Vietnam. Kreitzer succumbed on December 2, 1967, to burn injuries he suffered in the crash. The second pilot listed, MAJ Larry G. Powell, was a rotary wing (helicopter) pilot from the 45th Medical Company. Powell reportedly died after being evacuated to the U.S. Military burn unit at the 106th General Hospital in Yokohama, Japan. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, vvmf.org, and thewall-usa.com, and information provided by Don Yaxley (May 2018)]
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