EDWARD F FRATUS
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HONORED ON PANEL 15W, LINE 41 OF THE WALL

EDWARD FRANCIS FRATUS

WALL NAME

EDWARD F FRATUS

PANEL / LINE

15W/41

DATE OF BIRTH

02/17/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NGAI

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/09/1969

HOME OF RECORD

CONCORD

COUNTY OF RECORD

Merrimack County

STATE

NH

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR EDWARD FRANCIS FRATUS
POSTED ON 11.28.2020

Final Mission of SP5 Edward F. Fratus

On December 9, 1969, a U.S. Army helicopter UH-1H (tail number 68-16220) from Company A, 123rd Aviation Battalion, 23rd Infantry Division (Americal) was conducting a routine shuttle mission for support command when it crashed in bad weather into a hilltop three miles southwest of Minh Long Airfield in Quang Ngai Province, RVN. Three crewmen and three passengers were killed. The lost aircrew included co-pilot WO1 Ward L. Hooper Jr., crew chief SP4 Michael J. McClane, and gunner SP5 Edward F. Fratus; the lost were passengers LTC Karl F. Lange, MAJ Roger W. Heinz, and CPT Eugene P. Shumbris. The aircraft commander survived with injuries. The flight initiated at 7:15 AM from Ky Ha Heliport where the crew picked up passengers at the Division Administration pad, then departed for Minh Long. Following a change in passengers, the aircraft departed Minh Long in light rain enroute to Ba To. The helicopter was on a heading which would enable it to follow a valley to Ba To after passing through a saddle in a mountain. As the aircraft passed through the saddle, poor visibility caused the pilots to switch to Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). The aircraft commander assumed control of the ship from the co-pilot. He turned left and initiated a climb. After completing his turn, the aircraft commander looked through the chin bubble when he saw the mountainside approaching rapidly. As he attempted to climb over the hill, the main rotor's retreating blade contacted small shrubs and tall elephant grass on the uphill side of the mountain. As the helicopter continued forward, the skids struck the ground and were sheared off, causing the fuel cells to burst. The main rotor struck the ground and was sheared from the transmission. The tail boom was also severed from the fuselage of the aircraft. Momentum carried the aircraft forward another 150 feet. The destroyed helicopter burned in place; however, it was impossible to determine the exact final resting position of the aircraft because the slope where the accident occurred was approximately 60 degrees and many of the components rolled down the hill following the fire. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and vhpa.org]
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POSTED ON 10.12.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp5 Edward Fratus,
Thank you for your service as an Avionics Communication Equipment Repairer. On this day, Columbus reached our continent, and we honor all of you who stand for us. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 12.9.2016
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Veteran

Thank You

Thank you Spec 5 Fratus for your leadership and courage.
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POSTED ON 12.9.2013
POSTED BY: JERRY SANDWISCH WOOD CTY.OHIO VIETNAM VET 1969-70 ARMY 173rd ABN

NOT FORGOTTEN

THE WAR MAY BE FORGOTTEN BUT THE WARRIOR WILL ALWAYS BE REMEMBERED!!!! REST IN PEACE EDWARD.
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POSTED ON 11.10.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP5 Edward Francis Fratus, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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