CHARLES A ATWOOD JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 37W, LINE 73 OF THE WALL

CHARLES AARON ATWOOD JR

WALL NAME

CHARLES A ATWOOD JR

PANEL / LINE

37W/73

DATE OF BIRTH

09/05/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/09/1968

HOME OF RECORD

MIAMI

COUNTY OF RECORD

Miami-Dade County

STATE

FL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

EN3

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR CHARLES AARON ATWOOD JR
POSTED ON 3.28.2021
POSTED BY: John Fabris

Do Not Stand at my Grave and Weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

As long as you are remembered you will never die...
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POSTED ON 9.17.2020
POSTED BY: Jury Washington

Thank You For Your Valiant Service Sailor.

Without people like you our great nation would not exist. Rest in peace EN3. Atwood, I salute your brave soul. From a Coast Guard vet.
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POSTED ON 9.21.2019

Final Mission of EN3 Charles A. Atwood Jr.

On the afternoon of December 9, 1968, the U.S. Navy landing craft LCM-873 was directed by Naval Command at Cua Viet U.S. Navy Base to head over to Hon Gio (Tiger) Island and conduct an operational and weapons “shakedown,” the testing of its weapons and diesel motors prior to being assigned combat operations along the Cua Viet River. Unbeknownst to the four crewmen on LCM-873, U.S. surveillance of the area failed to notice that the island, eleven miles from the Vietnamese coastline, had been infiltrated by a contingent of 30-50 North Vietnamese Army soldiers. When the sailors began firing their weapons, the NVA opened up on the unsuspecting LCM. The craft was hit by AK-47, automatic weapons, and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Fragments from one of the rockets fatally injured EN3 Charles A. Atwood Jr. in the throat and chest. A second rocket knocked SN Carrol W. Minor overboard; his body was carried away by the tides and never found. The two remaining wounded crew of the LCM signaled with a white rag to a passing heavy attack destroyer, the USS Canberra (CA-70), and ran their craft into its port side. The crew of the Canberra lashed the two ships together, and the wounded were taken aboard. A detachment of Republic of Korea (ROK) Marines arrived on the Canberra by helicopter and descended to LCM-873 where they placed Atwood’s body in a body bag. It was later flown to one of the U.S. Navy’s hospital ships off the coast of Vietnam. The Canberra and two other Navy destroyers then opened fire, blasting suspected NVA positions on the island with its 5-inch guns for an hour before sending ROK Marines and a group of forty U.S. Marines to kill or capture any remaining enemy troops. No prisoners were taken. The damaged LCM-873 was later cut loose and towed back to its base at Cua Viet by another LCM. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Bob Wiltse (September 2019)]
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POSTED ON 9.5.2019
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Petty Officer Third Class Charles Aaron Atwood Jr., Served aboard LCM-873 (Landing Craft Mechanized 873), Detachment Cua Viet, United States Naval Support Activity (DaNang), United States Naval Forces Vietnam (USNAVFORV).
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POSTED ON 9.5.2019
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Petty Officer Third Class Charles Aaaron Atwood Jr., Served with LCM-873 (Landing Craft Mechanized 873), Detachment Cua Viet, United States Naval Support Activity (DaNang), United States Naval Forces Vietnam (USNAVFORV).
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