THOMAS M FELTON
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HONORED ON PANEL 21W, LINE 116 OF THE WALL

THOMAS MOODY FELTON

WALL NAME

THOMAS M FELTON

PANEL / LINE

21W/116

DATE OF BIRTH

07/19/1932

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH DUONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/14/1969

HOME OF RECORD

NEWTON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Newton County

STATE

MS

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

MAJ

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR THOMAS MOODY FELTON
POSTED ON 7.13.2021
POSTED BY: ANON

Never Forgotten

On the remembrance of your 89th birthday, and the 52 anniversary of your death, your sacrifice is not forgotten.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 7.11.2019
POSTED BY: Jan Felton Wilkinson

50 years later...

Daddy,
I can't believe that on Sunday it will be 50 years since God called you home! So many milestones you have missed and some amazing grandchildren! They would have adored you just as we did...always a Daddy's girl - Love and miss you! Jan
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POSTED ON 8.29.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Major Thomas Felton,
Thank you for your service as an Armored Reconnaissance Unit Commander (Pilot) with the 1st Cavalry. Another national holiday is coming, and we honor you this Labor Day. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 7.14.2016
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Vet

Distinguished Flying Cross

Thomas Moody Felton
Date of birth: July 19, 1932
Date of death: July 14, 1969
Place of Birth: Mississippi, Luvin
Home of record: Newton Mississippi

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Distinguished Flying Cross

Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

SYNOPSIS: Major (Armor) Thomas Moody Felton (ASN: 0-5307207), United States Army, was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight while serving with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam.

Action Date: Vietnam War

Service: Army

Rank: Major

Company: Troop C

Battalion: 1st Squadron

Regiment: 9th Cavalry Regiment

Division: 1st Cavalry Division
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POSTED ON 7.1.2014

Final Mission of MAJ Thomas M. Felton

On a rainy July 14, 1969, a UH-1B gunship helicopter from Troop C, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry was sent on a night combat support mission in Binh Duong Province, South Vietnam about 10 miles northeast of Ben Cat. Its crew included pilot MAJ Thomas M. Felton, copilot CWO Ernest D. Burns, door gunner PFC Dewey R. Butler, and crew chief SGT Ray G. Davis. The UH-1B was operating with a "Pink Team" when it collided in mid-air with the team's OH-6A LOH helicopter. The UH-1B lost its main rotor system and severed the tail boom of the OH-6A. The UH-1B exploded and caught fire, and continued in a northwesterly heading until it hit trees and exploded. It then crashed and burned. All four crewmembers of the UH-1B were killed, but the three crewmembers of the OH-6A survived and were evacuated from the area. The UH-1B, OH-6A and many other aircraft were in this area supporting a team of LRRP Rangers that had been ambushed, killing all but one of the LRRPS. This team was attempting to locate a site to insert a team to rescue the LRRP and recover the bodies. Due to the low light conditions the two aircraft collided. When search teams located the wreckage of the helicopters, they found the bodies of Burns, Davis, Felton, and Butler, whose remains had been mutilated. Identification was still possible as the LRRP captain on the search and rescue team recognized Butler's African-American features immediately. It was felt that the mutilation was not done by the enemy but was caused by the violent crash. All of the bodies were left at the crash site for that night because of heavy enemy activity. However, the following day Butler's body had disappeared before it could be recovered and an official positive identification could be made. Wild animal tracks were found leading away from the area, it was believed that the remains may have been carried away by the animals. There was, however, a boot recovered with the foot of a black male. SGT Davis had replaced the regular crew chief on this aircraft because that crew chief was flying on another helicopter at the time. SGT Davis was scheduled to leave Vietnam and the Army in 3 days. [Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.org]
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