STEVEN G ENGLAND
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HONORED ON PANEL 5W, LINE 106 OF THE WALL

STEVEN GLENN ENGLAND

WALL NAME

STEVEN G ENGLAND

PANEL / LINE

5W/106

DATE OF BIRTH

07/05/1951

CASUALTY PROVINCE

THUA THIEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/15/1971

HOME OF RECORD

POCATELLO

COUNTY OF RECORD

Power County

STATE

ID

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SGT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STEVEN GLENN ENGLAND
POSTED ON 7.3.2020
POSTED BY: ANOn

Never forgotten

On the remembrance of your 69th birthday, your sacrifice is not forgotten.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 8.8.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sgt Steven England,
Thank you for your service as an Airborne Qualified Medical NCO. Thank you for the lives you saved. We remember all you who gave their all. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 7.5.2018
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Sergeant Steven Glenn England, Served with Company L, 75th Infantry Regiment (Rangers), 101st Airborne Division.
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POSTED ON 6.16.2018
POSTED BY: bella addis

remembering steve

in the 8th grade, we did a research project to pick a veteran to learn all about and write a letter to before we visited the wall on our washington DC trip. i picked steven because we had the same birthday, but after learning all about him, we had a lot more in common than i thought. without even getting the honor to see him in person, i respect him so incredibly much, and will always treasure the name rubbing that i did at the wall. i'll never forget him and always be grateful for his service.
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POSTED ON 2.11.2016

Final Mission of SGT Steven G. England

On February 15, 1971, a U.S. Army helicopter UH-1H (tail number 68-16554) from B Troop, 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry attempted to extract a wounded Ranger in stormy monsoon weather and crashed with the loss of seven personnel. The aircraft departed Camp Eagle, RVN, on an emergency night evacuation mission at approximately 1840 hours during a period of marginal weather. The pilot reported 300 to 400 feet and one-half mile visibility. Fifty minutes into the mission, a difficult extraction of the wounded man was made using a McGuire rig and the aircraft lifted off. The aircraft almost immediately encountered instrument flight conditions. Flight was made back to Phu Bai and a ground-controlled approach (GCA) approach initiated with the wounded man still rigged beneath the aircraft. During this phase of the flight, notation has been made of the pilot making a transmission to the effect he was experiencing vertigo and turning over controls of the aircraft to the co-pilot. As the aircraft approached Phu Bai at 5500 feet, contact was made with approach control. An attempt was made to establish radar identification. The transponder and automatic direction finder (ADF) proved inoperative. After turning the aircraft 030 degrees contact was established. The aircraft was then told to climb to 6000 feet for terrain clearance. Downwind was established and the aircraft was told to descend to 1600 feet. Once under final controller authority the aircraft was vectored with some difficulty experienced in ground track, attributable to the McGuire rig, wind, and 40 knots airspeed, to the final approach course and told to begin a three degree rate of descent. All appeared normal, with the aircraft responding to directions, until approximately three miles on final. At this point the aircraft descended below the glide path in a right turn, and was lost from the GCA scope. Radio contact was also lost at this time. It was later observed by ground witnesses proceeding north of the village of Phu Thu executing a right turn. The impact of the aircraft at approximately 1952 hours indicated as nose low, right front corner of the fuselage first with skid touching simultaneously. Upon impact the aircraft separated, the transmission, rotor head and mast leaving the airframe and the engine staying with the major fuselage portion. The forward fuselage was destroyed by fire. It is believed that GCA forgot about the McGuire Rig and it became entangled in trees causing the aircraft to go inverted and crash. The lost crewmen included pilots CW2 Richard N. Concannon and WO1 Joseph S. Burke, crew chief SGT James P. Cobb, and gunner SP4 Zebulon M. Johnson Jr. There were three passengers aboard, 1LT James L. Smith, SGT Gabriel Trujillo, and SGT Steven G. England. [Taken from vhpa.org]
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