MEIR ENGEL
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (3)
HONORED ON PANEL 1E, LINE 77 OF THE WALL

MEIR ENGEL

WALL NAME

MEIR ENGEL

PANEL / LINE

1E/77

DATE OF BIRTH

09/12/1914

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/16/1964

HOME OF RECORD

PHILADELPHIA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Philadelphia County

STATE

PA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

LTC

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MEIR ENGEL
POSTED ON 10.16.2012
POSTED BY: Ray

Alls well

We still miss you 48 years later. Your impact is still felt.

read more read less
POSTED ON 4.13.2010
POSTED BY: DAN M. ARONESTY

GOD BLESS!

RABBI, I AM PROUD OF YOU! AND WILL NEVER FORGET YOUR SACRIFICE!
read more read less
POSTED ON 12.16.2006
POSTED BY: Dave Avery

Who Shall We Send

"An God said who shall we send.I answered I am here,send me."

Isaiah 6:8

Vitesse de Dieu
read more read less
POSTED ON 7.12.2005
POSTED BY: Bob Ross

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Frye – 1932

read more read less
POSTED ON 9.6.2003
POSTED BY: Jim McIlhenney

One of Philadelphia PA's 630 fallen sons.

Photo and article were taken from the Philadelphia Daily News of October 26, 1987. The special supplement entitled, 'SIX HUNDRED AND THIRTY,' was published in conjunction with the dedication of the Philadelphia Viet Nam Memorial.

A chaplain in three wars, Rabbi Engel was a spiritual advisor to Jewish GI's from the South Pacific to Europe. He was born in Palestine and came to the United States in 1937 after receiving a master's degree from Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Engel served briefly as the religious leader of Brith Sholom Community Center in Philadelphia before joining the Army in November 1943. After tours of duty in the Pacific, he returned to civilian life in 1946, serving congregations in North Carolina and Massachusetts. Meir was called back into the military, enlisting in the Air Force in September 1950. Over the next 14 years he saw combat in Korea, was the Jewish adviser to the European Army Command and became the first Jewish chaplain to be sent to Viet Nam. He died in the US Navy Hospital in Saigon on December 16, 1964, at the age of 50, after suffering a heart attack. The lieutenant colonel was survived by his wife, two sons, two brothers and two sisters.
read more read less