HONORED ON PANEL 32E, LINE 92 OF THE WALL

WAYNE ALVIN ECKLEY

WALL NAME

WAYNE A ECKLEY

PANEL / LINE

32E/92

DATE OF BIRTH

05/22/1936

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/29/1967

HOME OF RECORD

ENTERPRISE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Wallowa County

STATE

OR

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

CMS

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WAYNE ALVIN ECKLEY
POSTED ON 1.29.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear CMS Wayne Alvin Eckley, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 1.25.2014

A Hero I wore on my wrist

I have worn Wayne Eckley MIA bracelet and have had since the early 70's. I just now, after all these years can put a face to the name. I'm sadden in the way he passed, but am glad he is home. My Father, Ben Alexander fought in that war and passed away from Agent Orange. He suffered so much before he passed as he endured many health issues due to AO.I know how sad it is to loose a Father due to war and remember some of the sad stories my dad shared with me while he was in Vietnam. .The horrible things our Soldiers endure from war is so hard to swallow. They are all truly HEROES and sacrifice so much for our Country. I wish they would have been treated with respect back then like they are today. I am glad to see that people finally realize what they go through. Un like how our veterans were so badly treated from the public when they returned home from Vietnam. I'll never forget! It was so sad. All though I still think more needs to be done for our Veterans that they so much deserve. I cant imagine a family waiting so long to find out what had happened and the not knowing all the years Wayne's was MIA. I've carried him in my heart all these years along with so many Soldiers from the Vietnam War. I would like to pass over the bracelet I have, to his family. If any one could help me contact them I would greatly appreciate it. Rest In Peace, Wayne. You will never be forgotten and will always be appreciated for your sacrifices <3 Karen Alexander Holder
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POSTED ON 3.16.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Wayne is buried at Joseph Cemetery,Joseph, Wallowa County,OR.
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POSTED ON 2.3.2011

Never Forgotten

Rest in peace with the warriors.
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POSTED ON 12.20.2000
POSTED BY: Michael Robert Patterson

W. A. Eckley: In Honored Remembrance

October 26, 2000
VIETNAM WAR MIAS IDENTIFIED

Eleven U.S. Air Force servicemen missing in action from the Vietnam War have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial.

They are identified as Colonel Charles P. Claxton, Chicago, Illinois; Colonel Donald E. Fisher, Halfway, Oregon.; Lieutenant Colonel Edwin N. Osborne, Jr., Raiford, Florida; Lieutenant Colonel Gerald G. Van Buren, Toledo, Ohio; Lieutenant Colonel Gordon J. Wenaas, Mayville, North Dakota; Major Frank C. Parker III, Bridgeport, Pennsylvania; Chief Master Sergeant Jack McCrary, Madison, Tennessee; Chief Master Sergeant Wayne A. Eckley, Enterprise, Oregon; Chief Master Sergeant Gean P. Clapper, Altoona, Pennsylvania; and Chief Master Sergeant James R. Williams, Charlotte, North Carolina. The name of the eleventh crewmember is not being released at the request of his family. NOTE: Reported to be Chief Master Sergeant Edward Joseph Darcy. On December 29, 1967, their Air Force C-130E Hercules took off from

Nha Trang, Republic of Vietnam, on a special mission over North Vietnam. Approximately four hours into their mission, the crew made a radio report from an area near Lai Chau Province, North Vietnam. When they failed to return to base, a visual and electronic search was initiated. About a month later, the search was ended when the aircraft could not be located. In October and November 1992, a joint U.S./Socialist Republic of Vietnam team interviewed five witnesses who had knowledge of the crash site. Two of the witnesses had visited the area of the crash in 1967 or 1968 and provided information about the site. Some of the witnesses turned over identification cards or tags that contained the names of some of the crew members. The team visited the site and recovered some human remains.

In February 1993, the government of Vietnam turned over additional remains and a photocopy of more identification media. In October and November a joint team led by Joint Task Force-Full Accounting excavated the suspected crash site where they recovered aircraft wreckage, personal effects and human remains. In 1994 and 1995, Vietnamese citizens and government officials turned over additional remains. Department of Defense analysts concluded from the distributionof the aircraft wreckage that the C-130 hit a mountainside and that the crew was unaware of the impending crash. Nine parachutes wereaccounted for among the artifacts recovered, and there are no unresolved live sighting reports associated with this incident. Analysis of the remains and other evidence by the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory Hawaii established the identification of the eleven servicemen.

The U.S. government welcomes and appreciates the cooperation of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam that resulted in the accounting of these servicemen. We hope that such cooperation will bring increased results in the future. Achieving the fullest possible accounting of Americans missing in action is of the highest national priority.

All were buried together in Arlington National Cemetery on 15 November 2000.

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.com/oct262000.htm
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