WILLIAM L COVINGTON
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HONORED ON PANEL 13E, LINE 120 OF THE WALL

WILLIAM LEE COVINGTON

WALL NAME

WILLIAM L COVINGTON

PANEL / LINE

13E/120

DATE OF BIRTH

06/05/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TIN

DATE OF CASUALTY

01/07/1969

HOME OF RECORD

ROME

COUNTY OF RECORD

Floyd County

STATE

GA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

LT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILLIAM LEE COVINGTON
POSTED ON 12.9.2021
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for you service to our country so long ago sir. The remembrance from you friend Ric Graham is moving. As long as you are remembered you will always be with us...
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POSTED ON 6.5.2019
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Lieutenant William Lee Covington, Served with the 30th Naval Construction Regiment, 3rd Naval Construction Brigade, United States Naval Forces Vietnam (USNAVFORV).
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POSTED ON 2.9.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

THANK YOU

Dear Lt William Covington,
Thank you for your service as a Staff Corps - Engineering Officer. It is so important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 11.23.2017

Final Mission of LT William L. Covington

On January 7, 1969, a U.S. Marine Corps helicopter CH-46A (tail number 152552), call sign Lady Ace, from Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 164 (HMM 164), was conducting a routine flight between Marble Mountain Air Facility (MMAF) and Chu Lai for mail and passengers when it crashed into a mountain west of Chu Lai during bad weather. Four Marine crewmen and one U.S. Navy passenger were killed in the incident. Because of the weather, the aircraft was being vectored back to MMAF when radio contact was lost while it was heading southeast of Chu Lai over the South China Sea. It disappeared from radar while on a heading in a southeast direction. Search and rescue missions were launched and flew for a couple of days with negative results. The lost helicopter was not located until September 22, 1969. The crash site was undisturbed, and the remains were reported as significantly deteriorated, but intact. Prior to the discovery on land eight months later, it had been assumed to be a loss at sea. The lost crewmen included pilot 1LT Glenn J. Ford III, co-pilot 1LT Vincent L. Jacobs, and crewmen SGT Paul D. Fleming, and SGT Glenn E. Hobart III. The Navy passenger was LT William L. Covington of the 30th Naval Construction Regiment at Da Nang, RVN. [Taken from popasmoke.com]
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POSTED ON 7.4.2014
POSTED BY: Darillyn Lamb

Remembering

I just happened to pull up a link to this page, while I was looking for information about another William Covington, who was born about 40 years earlier. I feel a kinship with the men whose names are on the wall, though. I'm a Vietnam era military brat; one who went from childhood to adulthood, under the shadow of that war. My father, a career Marine, came home safely, twice. But, I don't think any of us has ever forgotten those who didn't. We have a "brats" Facebook community and those in my age group talk about it a lot. I think we all feel kind of like the young men who lost their lives in that were our brothers, or at least cousins. That's because we know how much our fathers cared about the younger men they commanded, whose life and well-being they made every effort to protect.

I can see that Bill was a great guy, one whom I'm sure has been very sorely missed by many people! We lose a lot of our best Americans in war, and I think Bill was one of them!
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