AUSTIN M CORBIERE
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HONORED ON PANEL 7E, LINE 42 OF THE WALL

AUSTIN MORRIS CORBIERE

WALL NAME

AUSTIN M CORBIERE

PANEL / LINE

7E/42

DATE OF BIRTH

02/19/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/09/1966

HOME OF RECORD

CANADA

STATE

ZZ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

LCPL

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR AUSTIN MORRIS CORBIERE
POSTED ON 6.12.2024
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Burial Information

Lcpl. Austin Corbiere is buried at Holy Trinity Anglican Cemetery in Little Current, Manitoulin, Canada.
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POSTED ON 3.30.2022
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. As long as you are remembered you will always be with us…..
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POSTED ON 10.2.2019
POSTED BY: Mary DeWitt

Lyman Corbiere retells the story of his uncle Austin Morris Corbiere

Austin Morris Corbiere was born on February 19, 1943 to mother Josephine (nee Kagesheongai) who was married to Frank Kewakundo. Frank was a travelling preacher who went place to place preaching the word, and having children. He had two daughters, Donna Bruder and Mary Lou Debassige and sons Steve and Austin Corbiere

The story goes that Austin arrived in this world to begin his journey.
When he was about 10-years-old he came to live with my family, we were living in Gore Bay near Tobacco Lake in a two-bedroom tar paper shack with 11 children. My parents were Phillip Corbiere (father) and Dorothy Corbiere (mother). Times were hard back then with no running water, an outside toilet and no bath tubs and in those times there was no welfare. We found work where we could, mostly helping farmers or working in the bush cutting firewood and plywood for the Ontario Paper Co., but we did alright. With all these people stuck in a small little space of a shack on a hot August night you can only imagine the smell, no thank you.
As Austin grew to about the age of 13 he went to work for a farmer, John Long on Barrie Island, and after that went to work for a mini Walmart in Gordon Township. For Lloyd Noble, who had a store that sold it all, from gas, groceries, and burgers to meat, feed, and hardware. Lloyd was the “Walmart” of the day and was also a very fine gentlemen who would give you the shirt off his back. I began working for him around 10 years of age and even stayed in his house. Lloyd was like a father to me and I will never forget him till the day I die, may God bless Lloyd Noble who helped many people through the years, including his wife Ruby who was a very nice and kind woman.
After this time Austin went to work in the southern Ontario around the Niagara region, the fruit belt, picking fruits and vegetables for $6 a day. My brother would also come follow me as we would help the harvest. After the fruit season would end we would head to Brantford to pick and prime tobacco (which was a very hard, dirty, and backbreaking job). After this season would end we would head back to West Bay again to find any work we could find working in the bush. We would mostly cut pulp wood. This was a cycled process repeated year after year for five years in southern Ontario and home again leaving no real time for Austin to go to school.
THE STORY CONTINUES ONLINE AT .
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POSTED ON 5.9.2019
POSTED BY: John Braun

In Honor

Austin, You are remembered.
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POSTED ON 5.9.2018
POSTED BY: John Braun

In Honor

Austin, You are remembered and honored. First Nations Warrior.
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