CHESTER L COONS
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HONORED ON PANEL 39E, LINE 69 OF THE WALL

CHESTER LEROY COONS

WALL NAME

CHESTER L COONS

PANEL / LINE

39E/69

DATE OF BIRTH

03/29/1936

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/17/1968

HOME OF RECORD

BISMARCK

COUNTY OF RECORD

Burleigh County

STATE

ND

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

ADJ2

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR CHESTER LEROY COONS
POSTED ON 1.20.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

THANK YOU

Dear ADJ2 Chester Coons,
Thank you for your service as an Aviation Machinist's Mate (Jet Engine Mechanic). I am glad you were identified in 1993. Welcome home. It is so important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 11.23.2014

Final Mission of ADJ2 Chester L. Coons

On February 17, 1968, an OP-2E from Observation Squadron 67 departed Thailand in a flight of four aircraft on an operational mission over Laos. The crew of the aircraft included CDR Glenn M. Hayden, LTJG James S. Kravitz, LT Curtis F. Thurman, ENS James C. Wonn, AO2 Clayborn W. Ashby Jr., ADJ2 Chester L. Coons, AN Frank A. Dawson, ATN1 Paul N. Donato, and AN James E. Martin. After completion of the first target run, the aircraft reported to its fighter escort and forward air control aircraft that it had been hit by small arms fire but would continue with the second target run. During the second run, the fighter escort reported the starboard engine of the OP-2 on fire. The OP-2 acknowledged the report and aborted the rest of their mission to return to home base. The last radio transmission from the aircraft was, "we're beat up pretty bad." The fighter escort climbed to the top of the overcast to await the OP-2 rendezvous, but the aircraft never emerged from the cloud base. The fighter dropped below the clouds to search for the OP-2 and found burning wreckage. No parachutes were seen, nor were any emergency radio beepers heard. Search and rescue efforts were negative. Investigation of the crash site was not feasible because of enemy presence in the area. The aircraft crashed about 34 kilometers northwest of Xepone in Savannakhet Province, Laos. The crash site was situated 2,800 meters south of route 91 in rugged terrain on the side of a 550 meter ridge, approximately 4 kilometers northwest of Muang Phin. The aircraft was on a reconnaissance mission and carried no ordnance. Because there was no direct witness to the crash of the OP2, it is not known whether any of the crew of nine survived, but assumed that they did not. All nine aboard were classified Killed, Body Not Recovered. Although this aircraft went down in a relatively populous area, it is not known whether the enemy knows the fates of the crewmembers. In 1993 remains identified as crewmen of this aircraft were returned to the United States. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
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POSTED ON 2.22.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear ADJ2 Chester Leroy Coons, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 4.9.2012
POSTED BY: Jim Reece

Remembrance

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POSTED ON 2.21.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Chester is buried at North Dakota Veterans Cemetery, Mandan, Morton County,ND.
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