DAVID W COON
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HONORED ON PANEL 5W, LINE 52 OF THE WALL

DAVID WILLIAM COON

WALL NAME

DAVID W COON

PANEL / LINE

5W/52

DATE OF BIRTH

05/22/1951

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NGAI

DATE OF CASUALTY

01/17/1971

HOME OF RECORD

FREDONIA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Chautauqua County

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CPL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DAVID WILLIAM COON
POSTED ON 11.11.2019
POSTED BY: Steven H Brown

Never Forgotten

Was at the Wall today for the wreath laying, Mr Dave. Stopped by 05w 52 afterwards to say hey and let you know that every thing you did, said and taught us younger neighborhood kids has never been forgotten. The leadership that you showed on the football field AND in life touched a lotta people. Knowing you was a privilege. I’ve no doubt that you carried this over to your unit and your mission. We’re all that much better for having known you man.... thank you!!!
You are not forgotten... never forgotten.
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POSTED ON 1.19.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

THANK YOU

Dear Cpl David Coon,
Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. Your anniversary just passed, so sad. It is so important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 10.5.2016

Final Mission of PFC David W. Coon

PFC David W. Coon, SP4 William B. Blackmon Jr., and SP4 John L. Dobroski were infantrymen serving with Recon Platoon, E Company, 1st Battalion, 52nd Infantry, 198th Light Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Recon Platoon operated out of LZ Stinson, a forward firebase in the I Corps tactical zone of the Central Highlands, Quang Ngai Province, RVN. On most missions they were inserted by helicopter into an area which they would patrol for five or more days in search of the enemy, then be picked up at another location by chopper and taken back to the firebase. Occasionally, the mission would include raiding villages at night or daybreak to try and find Viet Cong that might be visiting the village. On January 17, 1971, the platoon walked off of LZ Stinson at midnight and moved for two hours until they were outside of Tra Binh ville which they intended to raid. They were a full platoon of three squads, with about 9-10 men per squad. As the platoon got on line to sweep into the village, artillery from LZ Stinson sent up flares. The middle squad moved forward, but were faced with heavy vegetation and found only one way through it. The first man, PFC Coon, tripped a booby-trapped 105mm artillery shell which was raised off the ground. The explosion was devastating, and the results were terrifying. PFC Coon had been killed by the blast. SP4 Blackmon received massive wounds and died on the medivac helicopter. SP4 Dobroski suffered head injuries from which he died later that morning. A third soldier lost both legs at the knees, and a fourth lost one of his legs. Another had an arm wound that would get him sent home. One soldier was struck by shrapnel that embedded in his wallet which he had moved to a breast pocket when the platoon crossed a waist-high river en route to the ville. An Army photographer with the platoon was also injured. As the wounded were stacked like logs into the medevac helicopter, they began taking fire from outside the village. The lieutenant in charge would not let them go into the ville, as the platoon was scared and angry and bad things might have happened if they had. As a result of their losses, Recon was never again at full strength. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Dennis Loop (September 2016)]
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POSTED ON 3.27.2015
POSTED BY: PMB

A natural leader

He was always a leader...and friendly to all....
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POSTED ON 11.24.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear CPL David William Coon, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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