JOHN A ANDERSON
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HONORED ON PANEL 59E, LINE 16 OF THE WALL

JOHN AUSTIN ANDERSON

WALL NAME

JOHN A ANDERSON

PANEL / LINE

59E/16

DATE OF BIRTH

02/10/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

TAY NINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/13/1968

HOME OF RECORD

WILLIAMSVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Erie County

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JOHN AUSTIN ANDERSON
POSTED ON 11.30.2021
POSTED BY: Gregory Kraft

Our paper boy.

I was only 4 when John was our paperboy in Williamsville NY. He delivered the Buffalo news in our neighborhood. He used to stop by often to talk to my mom. He lived on our street McKinley Dr.
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POSTED ON 4.15.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

As long as you are remembered you will always be with us.
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POSTED ON 2.10.2021
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Specialist Four John Austin Anderson, Served with the Communications Platoon, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 11.9.2018

Attack on Nui Ba Den – May 13, 1968

On May 13, 1968, a U.S. military communications relay facility on the 3000-foot of summit of Nui Ba Den (Black Virgin Mountain) in Tay Ninh Province, RVN, was attacked by a Viet Cong force using 82mm mortars, rocket-propelled grenades, and satchel charges. The base was occupied by over 140 American personnel from numerous 25th Infantry Division and non-divisional units which were under one administration as D Company (Provisional), 125th Signal Battalion. The main unit atop Nui Ba Den was the 372nd Radio Relay Unit (RRU) out of Sobe, Okinawa, a special section of the American Security Agency. The attacking force was successful in breaching the perimeter of the mountaintop compound and destroyed all of the buildings on the two-acre camp built among rocks and boulders. Twenty-two Americans were killed in the attack, and one person went missing. The assault on the camp began at 9:45 PM with a combined 82mm mortar and rocket propelled grenade (RPG) barrage. U.S. personnel from the manned bunkers opened fire on the advancing enemy force, but the mortars and RPG’s destroyed several of the bunkers allowing the Viet Cong to pour into the camp. Many of the U.S. personnel displaced by the destroyed bunkers sought safety outside the camp’s perimeter in the rocks. The enemy secured a helicopter pad as a Command Post and mortar location, then split into groups at approximately 10:00 PM. A large group moved west up the hill behind a barrage laid down by the mortar crew on the helicopter pad. A smaller force continued along the south perimeter of the mountain, securing bunkers 11, 12, and 13. As each bunker was approached, the enemy threw satchel charges or hand grenades into the doorways. The personnel in each bunker manned their positions till they were forced to evacuate. The enemy spread out and placed satchel charges in the operations building and the officer’s quarters, destroying them and all the other buildings on the mountain. A lone radio operator was able to direct supporting forces which came to assist the besieged Americans. U.S. Air Force C-47 gunships and flare ships combined with UH-1C helicopter gunships provided fire and illumination during attack. By 2:30 AM, the enemy had left Nui Ba Den. No medical evacuations of survivors were possible until morning due to rain, fog, and gusting winds. The lost U.S. personnel included SP4 John A. Anderson, SGT Joseph Adams, SP4 Ralph R. Black, SGT Fernando Calle-Zuluaga, CPT George Coleman, PFC Samuel G. Connelly, SP4 Moses J. Cousin, SP4 Albert E. Dahl, CPT Arthur L. Davis, SP4 James A. Davis, SP4 Gary J. Gilin, SP4 Jeffrey W. Haerle, SP4 Paul R. Hoag Jr., SP4 Michael J. Juneau, SP4 Paul R. Lozano, SP4 Frank J. Makuh, PFC John P. McGonigal Jr., SGT Timothy J. Noden, SSG Ray W. Owen, SSG Harold A. Stone, 2LT Thomas N. Teague, and SSG Bobby C. Wood. PFC Donald G. Smith, who had been reported missing, was captured during the attack held for 243 day before he was released on January 1, 1969. Twenty-five Viet Cong were reportedly killed. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, wikipedia.org, and manchu.org/country/Nui_Ba_Den]
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POSTED ON 9.5.2016
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Remembered

DEAR SPECIALIST 4TH CLASS ANDERSON,
THANK YOU FOR BEING A TACTICAL WIRE OPERATIONS SPECIALIST. TODAY IS LABOR DAY - WHAT BETTER DAY TO THANK THOSE OF YOU WHO MADE CELEBRATING POSSIBLE - REST IN PEACE.
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