ALBERT COLLINS
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HONORED ON PANEL 10E, LINE 66 OF THE WALL

ALBERT COLLINS

WALL NAME

ALBERT COLLINS

PANEL / LINE

10E/66

DATE OF BIRTH

08/14/1945

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/03/1966

HOME OF RECORD

ATLANTA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Fulton County

STATE

GA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ALBERT COLLINS
POSTED ON 9.11.2011

Remembered

Rest in peace with the warriors.
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POSTED ON 8.9.2011

Never Forgotten

Photo courtesy of Manuel Cazeras and 1-22infantry.org.
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POSTED ON 8.9.2011

The Naming of Camp Enari

As Colonel Jud Miller, commanding officer of the 2nd Brigade of the
4th Infantry Division, completed preparations in late June 1966 for leading
his brigade from Fort Lewis, Washington to Vietnam, Major General Arthur
Collins, Division Commander, called him to his headquarters to wish him
luck and give him final instructions. Among other things, Colonel Miller
was to establish the base camp which the division would occupy when they
arrived later in the year.
“Jud, I want you to name the base camp after the first GI killed by hostile
fire after you get to Vietnam. That would be a fitting tribute to a brave soldier”,
said General Collins in his parting instruction as Colonel Miller left in early
July, 1966 to board the plane taking the advance party to the division’s new
home south of Pleiku, Vietnam.
On September 3, 1966, while operating on a search and destroy mission
as a member of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment,
PFC Albert Collins became the first 4th Infantry Division soldier killed in
action when he was cut down by heavy fire from a Vietcong unit.
Knowing General Collins would not want it to be perceived that the
base camp was named after him, Colonel Miller sent a back channel message
to General Collins at Fort Lewis explaining his proposed alternative plan for
naming the base camp. “Since the first enlisted man killed in action was named
Collins, I recommend we name the base camp after the first officer killed in
action.” General Collins agreed with Colonel Miller’s recommendation.
On November 5, 1966, while participating in Operation Paul Revere
IV with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, Lieutenant
Richard Collins, graduate of the West Point class of 1965, became the first
4th Infantry Division officer killed in Vietnam when he was shot by a dug in
North Vietnamese force. By now, General Collins had arrived in Vietnam
and discussed the dilemma with Colonel Miller. “We’ll name the base camp
after the first posthumous recipient of the Silver Star, regardless of his name
or rank,” was the agreed to plan.
Lieutenant Mark Enari had worked on the 2nd Brigade staff and was
constantly prodding Colonel Miller to let him go to a line company to lead a
rifle platoon. As a replacement was needed in the 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry
Regiment, Lieutenant Enari received his wish and was sent to take over a rifle
platoon. On December 2, 1966, Lieutenant Mark N. Enari earned the Silver
Star while fighting the North Vietnamese regulars during Operation Paul
Revere IV in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. Lieutenant Enari died as a
result of the wounds he received during that battle.
Early in 1967, the 4th Infantry Division’s base camp, sitting at the foot
of Dragon Mountain in the Central Highlands of Vietnam, was named Camp
Enari in honor of Lieutenant Mark Enari and retained that name as long as
American forces were in Vietnam.

PFC Albert Collins’ name is engraved on Panel 10E, line 66 on the Vietnam
Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C., Lieutenant Richard G. Collins’ name is
engraved on Panel 12E, line 27 on the Wall, and Lieutenant Mark N. Enari’s
name is on Panel 13E, line 4 on the Wall.

From my book What Now, Lieutenant?
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POSTED ON 8.8.2011

Albert Remembered

The wreath I place on his grave each Memorial Day
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POSTED ON 8.8.2011
POSTED BY: Bob

Photo

PFC Collins was the first KIA from my battalion and the 4th Infantry Division in Vientam
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