PAUL F COBB
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HONORED ON PANEL 61E, LINE 7 OF THE WALL

PAUL FREDERICK COBB

WALL NAME

PAUL F COBB

PANEL / LINE

61E/7

DATE OF BIRTH

07/26/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/16/1968

HOME OF RECORD

ROANOKE

COUNTY OF RECORD

City Of Roanoke

STATE

VA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

2LT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR PAUL FREDERICK COBB
POSTED ON 5.16.2011
POSTED BY: Chad Crawford

Thank You

Your sacrifice and service will never be forgotten. I'm very grateful that there are brave marines like yourself willing to protect our country and our freedoms, thank you sir!
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POSTED ON 11.29.2010
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Paul is buried at Sherwood Memorial Park, Salem,VA. NC PH
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POSTED ON 7.31.2007
POSTED BY: Dave Avery

Navy Cross

Our Nations second highest award for valor.
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POSTED ON 9.7.2003
POSTED BY: CLAY MARSTON

MARINE CORPS VIETNAM VETERANS HELP SON KNOW THE DAD HE LOST

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, CALIFORNIA

4 SEPTEMBER 2003

Gunshots, screams, fierce bombardment, fog, confusion, uncertainty - they're all earmarks of war that left one young lieutenant mortally wounded without a chance to meet his newborn baby boy.

When PAUL FREDERICK COBB JR. was born, his proud father serving in Vietnam spread the word to his fellow Marines as he celebrated the birth of his first child entering the world thousands of miles away in America.

But the urgency of war quickly sidetracked his joy.

Second Lieutenant PAUL FREDERICK COBB, a platoon commander with the 1st Marine Division, led his men to reinforce fellow Marines in a brutal attack against the enemy.

The fight, for which he later received the NAVY CROSS, cost him his life and the chance of ever meeting his namesake.

That's when Marines serving alongside Cobb took on a new assignment - reuniting the son with his brave father, through their words, memories and gestures.

It took more than 30 years to accomplish their mission. But now, Paul F. Cobb Jr. has a much deeper understanding of who his father was as military man, after attending reunions of his dad's old unit, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment.

"I always remembered how Lieutenant Cobb never had a chance to meet his son, and wanted to do something about it," said retired Master Sergeant Laurence H. Peterson, a platoon commander who served in Vietnam next to Cobb. Peterson and Cobb were interviewed here last month while Cobb was vacationing in California.

During a 1/7 reunion in 1999, Peterson brought up the idea to track down Paul F. Cobb Jr.

Former police officer Nat Holmes joined him in the hunt.

Later that year, Peterson found Cobb and sent him a letter, hoping to receive a call back.

In November 1999, Cobb made the call.

"I had gone over in my head a million times what I wanted to say, but when he called, I was so happy, I just started talking," Peterson said.

Eventually, the words he had rehearsed came.

"I told him his father loved him very much and I would be honored to give him a hug his father never could," Peterson related.

"It was like a dream come true," Cobb said. "I've always wanted to know about my father as a Marine."

When the opportunity arose, Cobb attended the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 2000 reunion, where he received his hug from Peterson and the chance to meet several men who knew his father in combat.

In honor of Cobb and his son, the reunion committee read the Navy Cross citation as part of their ceremony.

Also that night, a former Marine, Fred Hawthorne, introduced himself to Cobb and told him about the evening his father passed on.

Now adopted into the 1/7 family, Cobb has attended two reunions and kept in close touch with these Marines.

"It's our chance to give something back to him," Peterson stated.

"I have always had a desire to know about my father. Because we never met, there have always been unanswered questions," Cobb said.

"My friends and family told me about what type of person he was, but I never knew what type of Marine he was," he added. "Now I do."

Alhough he has always been cautious about his father, Cobb never hurt for affection, he said. His mother remarried when he was young and he grew up with a very supportive father.

Now 35 years later, Cobb is also a proud father of a 5-year-old daughter and a 3-year-old son, PAUL FREDERICK COBB III.



Submitted by:- MCB CAMP PENDLETON

Story Identification Number:- 200394195749

Story by Lance Corporal Jenn Steimer



Transcribed by

WWW.HISTORICALMILITARIA.COM

BIOGRAPHER OF THE LOST OF THE VIETNAM ERA
- 1955 to 1975 -


" REMEMBRANCE "


7 September 2003


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POSTED ON 6.3.2001
POSTED BY: CLAY MARSTON

IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS HEROIC UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS OFFICER A POSTHUMOUS RECIPIENT OF THE NAVY CROSS


LIEUTENANT

PAUL FREDERICK COBB


who served as


PLATOON COMMANDER

of

COMPANY ' A '

FIRST BATTALION

SEVENTH MARINES

FIRST MARINE DIVISION

FLEET MARINE FORCE


was a posthumous recipient of the


NAVY CROSS

PURPLE HEART


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


CITATION

FOR AWARD OF THE


NAVY CROSS


TO


LIEUTENANT

PAUL FREDERICK COBB




For extraordinary heroism while serving as a
Platoon Commander with Company A,
First Battalion, Seventh Marines,
First Marine Division in the
Republic of Vietnam on 16 May 1968.
During Operation ALLEN BROOK in
Quang Nam Province, Lieutenant Cobb's
platoon was assigned the mssion of
reinforcing an adjacent unit which was
heavily engaged with a well-entrenched
enemy force and had sustained numerous
casualties. Under intense fire, he led
his men to a position behind the most
heavily engaged element of the besieged
company where he prepared to continue
the attack against the enemy. In order
that the pinned-down Marines could
evacuate their casualties from the
fire-swept area, he established a base of
fire utilizing small arms and M-79
grenade launcher fire and began
manoeuvering his unit across the
hazardous terrain. Forced to crawl
forward toward the hostile emplacements
due to a heavy volume of the enemy's
automatic weapons, machine gun,
B-40 rocket and mortar fire, he
ignored the fire striking all round him,
as he shouted directions and
encouragement to his men.
As he approached to within 20
meters of the enemy's positions,
he was wounded by hostile fire,
however, he aggressively led
his men in hand-to-hand combat.
While manoeuvering forward with
his men, he was mortally
wounded by the enemy fire.
His courageous leadership
during the initial and ensuing
assaults inspired his men to
continue to advance and
overwhelm the enemy to the
point of defeat. By his bold
determination and unwavering
and selfless dedication to
duty, Lieutenant Cobb upheld
the highest traditions of the
United States Marine Corps
and the United States Naval Service.

He gallantly gave his life for his country.





~~~ SEMPER FIDELIS ~~~





YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE




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