ROBERT A CLEMENTS
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HONORED ON PANEL 16W, LINE 112 OF THE WALL

ROBERT ANDREW CLEMENTS

WALL NAME

ROBERT A CLEMENTS

PANEL / LINE

16W/112

DATE OF BIRTH

03/03/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

HUA NGHIA

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/23/1969

HOME OF RECORD

PADUCAH

COUNTY OF RECORD

McCracken County

STATE

KY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CAPT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ROBERT ANDREW CLEMENTS
POSTED ON 12.30.2021
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. As long as you are remembered you will remain in our hearts forever...
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POSTED ON 3.3.2019
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Captain Robert Andrew Clements, Served with D Troop, 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 3.3.2019

Robert

Robert....Honoring you on your birthday....God Bless
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POSTED ON 12.12.2017
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

THANK YOU

Dear Captain Robert Clements,
Thank you for your service as a Rotary Wing Aviation Unit Commander - Helicopter Pilot. December has begun, along with all the preparations. It is so important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 11.29.2014

Final Mission of U.S. Army helicopter AH-1G tail number 67-15667

This aircraft from D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division “Centaurs” was on a visual reconnaissance mission. At approximately 0630 hours the light scout team, consisting of AH-1G (67-15669) and an observation helicopter, departed Cu Chi base camp on their visual reconnaissance mission. The team proceeded west to Fire Support Base Jackson located at XT 425168. As they passed south of FSB Jackson, the AH-1G commander observed some small fires southwest of their location. The AH-1G aircraft commander instructed his observation helicopter pilot to continue in a westerly direction while he proceeded to determine the significance of the small fires. At this time, the AH-1G was at approximately 600 feet. He turned toward the southwest and proceeded toward the area which contained the fires. As he arrived over the area, he made a non-firing dive to approximately 300 feet. During the dive he started a left hand turn to bring him back to the area his observation helicopter had moved. It is assumed he had ascertained that the fires were of no tactical value and was going to rejoin his wingman. As he started his turn back to the north, witnesses describe an explosion and what appeared to be the observation helicopter falling away to the west. This object was, in fact, the main rotor head and rotor blades which separated from the aircraft. Immediately prior to this event, the tail rotor separated from the aircraft causing the nose to pitch sharply downward and to the right from the loss of anti-torque control and center of gravity. At the instant the tail rotor separated from the aircraft, it is suspected the pilot over compensated for the aircraft yaw and loss of center of gravity with a violent cyclic maneuver. This violent maneuver induced severe mast bumping, which, in turn, caused the main rotor head to separate from the mast. It is also possible that the pilot immediately reduced collective when the tail rotor failure occurred, causing the rotor head to lose its load forces. This, in turn would induce severe mast bumping and loss of the rotor head. As a consequence of the loss of the rotor head, the aircraft plummeted to the ground where its fuel and ordinance caused an explosion and fire which destroyed the aircraft. Both crew members, CAPT Robert A. Clements and WO1 Alexander C. Brown, suffered fatal injuries in the crash.
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