CHRISTOPHER L CLEARWATERS
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HONORED ON PANEL 5W, LINE 123 OF THE WALL

CHRISTOPHER L CLEARWATERS

WALL NAME

CHRISTOPHER L CLEARWATERS

PANEL / LINE

5W/123

DATE OF BIRTH

07/15/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PHUOC LONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/20/1971

HOME OF RECORD

SEATTLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

King County

STATE

WA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

1LT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR CHRISTOPHER L CLEARWATERS
POSTED ON 3.27.2014
POSTED BY: Jan Dow Haybert

My First Love

Chris and I met when his parents moved into a house a few doors down from ours at Fort Eustis. We dated through his Junior and Senior year at The Citadel. We broke up and both went our separate ways. I think it was Roger Garrett who told me Chris had died in Vietnam - a passenger on a helicopter that was shot down. He was a stand up guy and I am proud to have known him. I have thought of him often over the years and prayed for him and his family. May he rest in peace.
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POSTED ON 2.1.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear 1LT Christopher L Clearwaters, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 1.16.2014
POSTED BY: Jim Chappelear Citadel Class of 1968 Lt Col USAF retired

Remembering the good times

I met Chris in the summer of 1965 at the Citadel when he entered the Citadel as a freshman. I was his squad corporal. Our jobs as upperclassmen was to administer the system to our "knobs". Chris was my knob. I could not help but to like him. He was special as he later proved during his years at the Citadel. During my senior year I was E Company Commander. Chris was my 1st Sergeant. It was a good match. Like all classes graduating from the Citadel during the 60's, we lost classmates in Vietnam Nam. It has been 45 yrs since leaving our beloved Citadel. Those of us who survived VN remember our dear friends and classmates as Chris. We love you and will see you again. RIP brother.
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POSTED ON 5.28.2008
POSTED BY: Lauren Clearwaters

I did not know him

I did not know Chris.Only thru what I have read. I have been to his and his Fathers grave in hawaii,while visting my son who is in the Navy there.
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POSTED ON 1.30.2006
POSTED BY: Arnold M. Huskins

An American hero

Taken from the website:
http://www.facesfromthewall.com/1971jan.html#cleach

Services held in Honolulu for 1st Lt. Clearwaters

Military funeral services for Army 1st Lt. Christopher L. Clearwater, 23, former Seattleite and member of a military family, were held Friday in Honolulu.
Lieutenant Clearwaters, who was assigned to the 1st Air Cavalry Division in Vietnam, was killed 20 Feb (1971) when the helicopter in which he was riding crashed and burned after coming under enemy fire in Southeast Asia.
Lieutenant Clearwaters was the son of Army Lt. Col. and Mrs. Boyd H. Clearwaters, former Laurelhurst residents, now of Honolulu. Colonel Clearwaters is widely known for his work in aiding Korean orphans.
Born in Seattle, Lieutenant Clearwaters attended Laurelhurst Elementary School and graduated from high school in Philadelphia. He joined the Army after graduating with honors from The Citadel, Charleston SC in 1969. He went to Vietnam last summer.
Survivors besides his parents are a brother, Army Capt. Boyd L. Clearwaters, in Vietnam; two sisters, Mrs. Robert Marsh, Fort Bragg, NC and Mrs. Q. E. D. Lewis, Gulfport MS, and his maternal grandmother, Mrs. Richard F. White, Seattle. (Seattle Times, Seattle WA, 5 Mar 1971)

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