THOMAS H AMOS
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HONORED ON PANEL 1W, LINE 4 OF THE WALL

THOMAS HUGH AMOS

WALL NAME

THOMAS H AMOS

PANEL / LINE

1W/4

DATE OF BIRTH

09/25/1940

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

04/20/1972

HOME OF RECORD

REPUBLIC

COUNTY OF RECORD

Greene County

STATE

MO

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

MAJ

THIS NAME WILL BE READ AS PART OF THE READING OF THE NAMES ON

11/10/2022 at 11:02pm

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REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR THOMAS HUGH AMOS
POSTED ON 4.17.2010

If I should die...remembrances for MAJ. Thomas Hugh AMOS, USAF...who made the ultimate sacrifice!!!!

If I should die, and leave you here awhile, be not like others, sore undone, who keep long vigils by the silent dust, and weep...for MY sake, turn again to life, and smile...Nerving thy heart, and trembling hand to do something to comfort other hearts than thine...Complete these dear, unfinished tasks of mine...and I, perchance, may therein comfort you.
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POSTED ON 8.8.2008
POSTED BY: Arnold Huskins

An American patriot

A stranger remembered
Berks woman makes contact with kin of Vietnam vet

by Bruce R. Posten
The Reading Eagle

Lingering memories sometimes can be terribly painful, but they also can be inspiring and filled with wonder.

For 35 years, Jackie D. Rosello remembered the name of Thomas H. Amos, an Air Force pilot, declared missing in action when his F-14 plunged into a forest near the Ho Chi Minh Trail on April 1972, during the Vietnam War.

Rosello didn’t know Amos. She wasn’t family, friend, colleague or acquaintance.

But as a high school student in 1972, Rosello and her younger sisters received metal bracelets in their Christmas stockings, gifts from their mother.

Rosello’s bracelet had Amos’ name on it.

“We are a military-minded family,” said Rosello, 51, wife of Donald, 55, a Navy veteran of the Vietnam era who is a job coach at Goodwill Industries.

“My dad (Joseph DeLapp, 80, Wyomissing) was a World War II Navy pilot,” she said. “When we were growing up, he was always telling us to take pride in our country and respect military people.”

Meanwhile, her bracelet, though less prominently displayed than a flag, was kept safe in her jewelry box through the decades. More recently, the bracelet has been secure in a bank vault. To her, it has always remained valuable.

“It is just a bracelet,” said Rosello, the mother of two sons, Anthony, 19 and Dan. 15, “but I never thought it also would turn out to be a life journey.”

For years, Rosello, an occupational therapist at Berks Heim, wondered about the man behind the name on her bracelet. She often thought of his fate and his family.

She had little success finding out anything about him until military documents became declassified, and computers opened up an information highway.

“Through all the years, I didn’t want his family to think that he had been forgotten,” Rosello said. “I really wanted them to know there was someone else out there thinking of him, appreciating him for what he did to serve his country, someone out there besides them.”

In 1995, a door opened for Rosello when the so-called Vietnam Veterans Memorial Traveling Wall came to Forest Hills Memorial Park, Exeter Township, with its list of veterans. She found the name of Amos there.

From The Wall, she made a rubbing of his name, and was able to glean basic information about when and where he was born (Sept. 25, 1940 in Republic, Mo.), as well as the date he was recorded missing in action and his rank. He was a captain, made a major posthumously.

From that tiny bit of information, and a subsequent article in Parade magazine that listed Web sites and addresses to learn more about veterans, Rosello pieced together her pilot’s story.

She discovered from government Web sites that Amos and his co-pilot, Mason L. Burnham of Eugene, Ore., were killed in 1972 when their plane crashed while flying a night escort mission on the Laotian and Vietnamese border.

Their deaths were only partially confirmed, however, in 1989 when Vietnamese natives stumbled on the wreckage in a remote part of Quang Nam-Da Nang Province.
Official reports indicated that difficult terrain and unexploded ordnance made recovery efforts slow, but by 1998 searchers found the men’s dog tags and enough bone fragments to confirm their deaths.

A full-military memorial ceremony was held for both men at Arlington National Cemetery in 1999, attended by their families.

In 2004, while attending a Naval Academy football game in Annapolis, Md. with family members, Rosello made a side trip to the cemetery. She had a nephew photograph her behind his monument.

About a year later, she said, while visiting the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Web site — The Wall-USA — she discovered a posting from an Amos family member, Pat Dunlap of Edmond, Okla., the pilot’s sister.

It was the first time she had a family contact.

“I sent a letter to her stating that I wanted the family to know that Maj. Thomas Amos had been thought of all these years,” she said. “I also sent the picture my nephew took of me standing behind the gravestone and a copy of the rubbing I had made at The Wall.”

“After all these years, I really didn’t know if she (Dunlap) would think that I was some kind of kook, but I asked if she could send me a picture of Maj. Amos, because I really wanted to put a face with the name,” Rosello said.

For weeks there was no response. Rosello waited ... for a few more months.

Then, a letter from Pat Dunlap arrived. Apprehensive, Rosello held it to her chest for 10 minutes, at first afraid to open it.

When she finally did, it read: “Dear Jackie, Receiving your letter and picture was a wonderful surprise. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your thoughtfulness.”

Dunlap enclosed pictures of her brother, his two children and herself. She told Rosello that their father died in 1995, and their mother died in 2003. She said Amos’s wife had died of cancer.

“Please keep in contact, I would love to hear from you again,” Dunlap wrote. “I was so moved by your letter that I read it to my Bible study group.”

She also said when her family made their 1999 trek from Oklahoma for her brother’s memorial service at Arlington, the monument had not yet been placed on his grave.

Rosello’s photograph was the first time she and her family got to see monument.

It meant a lot.

Cold monuments and metal bracelets endure. They can be filled with meaning, This, Rosello has learned. She also knows there is nothing quite so poignant as human memories.

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POSTED ON 4.20.2007
POSTED BY: Dave Avery

On Silver Wings

On Silver Wings
They Flew The Skies
These Brave Young Men
Who Fought And Died
When Duty Called
They went So Brave
Now Families Mourn
Beside Their Grave
Who Can Forget
What Courage They Had
Some Have,Some Did
And That's So Sad
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POSTED ON 4.20.2005
POSTED BY: Bob Ross

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Frye – 1932

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POSTED ON 3.5.2005
POSTED BY: Jackie Rosello

POW/MIA Bracelet

I was given Maj. Thomas Amos POW/MIA bracelet when I was in high school. I would like to get in touch with a direct family member to let them know he is still thought of. Last summer I went to Arlington to see his grave site,it was very emotional for me to finally "see" him. He is remembered.God rest his soul.
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