GARY L CLARK
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HONORED ON PANEL 21W, LINE 6 OF THE WALL

GARY LEE CLARK

WALL NAME

GARY L CLARK

PANEL / LINE

21W/6

DATE OF BIRTH

12/19/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

KONTUM

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/24/1969

HOME OF RECORD

SEYMOUR

COUNTY OF RECORD

Jackson County

STATE

IN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR GARY LEE CLARK
POSTED ON 12.23.2021
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. As long as you are remembered you will always be with us....
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POSTED ON 12.20.2019
POSTED BY: Malli

Gary

Gary..........Honoring you on your birthday........Never forgotten.....God Bless
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POSTED ON 12.19.2019
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Specialist Four Gary Lee Clark, Served with Company B, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 1.17.2018

Final Mission of SP4 Gary L. Clark

In the summer of 1969, B Company, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, occupied LZ Bass in Kontum Province, RVN. The company’s 81mm mortar crew, however, was relocated from LZ Bass to an airstrip at Dak To to fire illumination rounds at night and give support around the perimeter. On June 24, 1969, the mortar crew was given a detail to locate a sling load of ammunition that had fallen near the airstrip from an Army CH-46 Chinook resupply helicopter. The squad was accompanied on the mission with some men from the line platoons. The detachment was moved in a truck for about two kilometers from the air strip, then walked approximately one and a half kilometers to the fallen ammunition. The men were instructed not to touch any of the munitions, instead secure the area until the engineers could blow it in place. As the men took up positions around the fallen ordinance, an explosion occurred. Mortar platoon members SP4 Gary L. Clark, SP4 Lavon N. Prather, PFC Richard D. Roberts, and SP4 Woodrow N. Trissell Jr. were killed instantly in the blast. PFC Dean C. Wilson was critically wounded with massive trauma to the front of his body. The explosion caused him to land into the middle of the pile of fallen ammo which itself had not detonated. Three other soldiers were wounded. Evidently, one of the troopers had hit a trip wire set by the enemy before they arrived. Two of the survivors stated that they had heard a “click” sound just before the blast occurred. One of the survivors, a medic, suffered only minor wounds, and administered aid to the others. He removed Wilson from the ordinance. Critically injured, he was having trouble breathing. The medic would give him five or six rescue breaths, assist the other wounded, then return to Wilson. The radio was still working and he called a dustoff. Soon, two AH-1G Cobra helicopter gunships appeared above, and began circling the beleaguered party. A dustoff arrived, but could not land due to the density of the jungle. The wounded were evacuated in a litter by cable to the awaiting helicopter. Wilson expired before he was lifted out. The other two wounded were taken to a hospital in Kontum and survived. The following day, the battalion chaplain arrived at LZ Bass from Pleiku and conducted a memorial service for the five fallen men. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information from Larry D. Harris (November 2011) and Thomas R. Mueller (March 2005), provided by Frederick Golladay (January 2018)]
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POSTED ON 11.30.2017
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp4 Gary Clark,
Thank you for your service as an Indirect Fire Infantryman. This is the month that we remember all those who have passed-on. We remember you. It is so important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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