EDWARD J CAVANAUGH
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HONORED ON PANEL 3W, LINE 117 OF THE WALL

EDWARD JOSEPH CAVANAUGH

WALL NAME

EDWARD J CAVANAUGH

PANEL / LINE

3W/117

DATE OF BIRTH

11/27/1923

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/29/1971

HOME OF RECORD

WORCESTER

COUNTY OF RECORD

Worcester County

STATE

MA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

COL

Book a time
Contact Details
ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR EDWARD JOSEPH CAVANAUGH
POSTED ON 7.29.2015
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Vet

Silver Star Citation - Korean War

Edward Joseph Cavanaugh
Date of birth: November 27, 1923
Date of death: July 29, 1971
Home of record: Worcester Massachusetts
Status: KIA

Edward Cavanaugh earned a the Silver Star in both the Korean War and in Vietnam, the latter being a posthumous award.
AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Silver Star
Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Edward Joseph Cavanaugh (ASN: 0-28499), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, near Kumhwa, Korea. On 22 August 1952, Captain Cavanaugh, observing a friendly patrol sustain several casualties in a firefight with an enemy force, immediately organized a patrol to go to the assistance of the wounded men. Leading the group through the intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and mortar fire, Captain Cavanaugh succeeded in removing the casualties from the battle area and carrying them to safety. Upon reaching friendly lines, Captain Cavanaugh again organized a rescue party and returned to the battle area to remove the remaining wounded personnel. Captain Cavanaugh remained in his exposed position until he had made certain that all known wounded had received medical attention and then, personally assisted in carrying the last wounded man from the area. When he had returned to friendly lines he learned that there were two men missing and he organized another party to return a third time to the withering enemy fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Cavanaugh moved about in the area subjected to the most intense concentration of enemy fire in his determined efforts to locate the missing men. When he had approached to within thirty feet of the enemy's positions, Captain Cavanaugh was wounded in the arm and leg and was unable to move, yet he refused to be evacuated until all the other wounded had been taken care of. The gallantry displayed by Captain Cavanaugh reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

General Orders: Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 423 (October 8, 1952)

Action Date: August 22, 1952

Service: Army

Rank: Captain

Company: Headquarters

Battalion: 1st Battalion

Regiment: 31st Infantry Regiment

Division: 7th Infantry Division
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POSTED ON 1.15.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering an American Hero

Dear Colonel Edward Joseph Cavanaugh, sir,

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for the ultimate sacrifice that you made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. And please know that men and women like you have stepped forward to defend our country yet again, showing the same love for country and their fellow Americans that you did- you would be proud.

With respect, and the best salute that a civilian can muster for you.

Curt Carter

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POSTED ON 2.15.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Edward is buried at United States Military Academy Post Cemetery, West Point, Orange County,NY. 2 SS 3 LM 2 BSM ARCOM 2 PH
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POSTED ON 2.15.2011

Remembered

Rest in peace with the warriors.
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POSTED ON 10.22.2007
POSTED BY: CLAY MARSTON

CITATION FOR POSTHUMOUS AWARD OF THE SILVER STAR TO THIS MOST HEROIC UNITED STATES ARMY OFFICER


COLONEL

EDWARD JOSEPH CAVANAUGH

SENIOR ADVISOR

ADVISORY TEAM 4

MILITARY ASSISTANCE COMMAND, VIETNAM

1st TASK FORCE

ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM


CITATION FOR POSTHUMOUS AWARD OF

THE SILVER STAR


( SECOND AWARD )

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting an Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Edward Joseph Cavanaugh (0-28499), Colonel (Infantry), United States Army, for gallantry in action on 29 July 1971, while serving with Advisory Team 4, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, as Senior Advisor, 1st Task Force, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. Colonel Cavanaugh was visiting the 51st Infantry Regiment at Hill 55 in Quang Nam Province, when the enemy began a rocket attack on the location. Without hesitation, Colonel Cavanaugh secured a pair of binoculars and began observing the incoming rockets. At the same time, he continually sought out information concerning casualties, damage assessment and updating on the counter battery fire being placed on the enemy. After the first rounds had landed there was a brief lull and it was at this time that he ordered a Medevac Helicopter and appraised the damage caused. He immediately exposed himself and took up a position to better observe the area from where the attack was being launched. When the attack was resumed Colonel Cavanaugh maintained this position watching the flash and marking the rockets' points of origin. Critically wounded by an incoming rocket, he tenaciously continued to observe and report until, over his own objections, he was medevaced for treatment. Colonel Cavanaugh's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.





YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE



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