RICHARD A CARUOLO
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (3)
HONORED ON PANEL 6E, LINE 41 OF THE WALL

RICHARD ANTHONY CARUOLO

WALL NAME

RICHARD A CARUOLO

PANEL / LINE

6E/41

DATE OF BIRTH

04/11/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NGAI

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/23/1966

HOME OF RECORD

PROVIDENCE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Providence County

STATE

RI

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

LCPL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR RICHARD ANTHONY CARUOLO
POSTED ON 10.15.2017
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Thank You

Dear Lcpl Richard Caruolo,
Thank you for your service as a Rifleman. It is important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
read more read less
POSTED ON 1.31.2016
POSTED BY: wkillian@smjuhsd.org

Final Mission of LCPL Richard A. Caruolo

LCPL Richard A. Caruolo was a rifleman serving with K Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines. The following is an account of his loss on March 22, 1966 as related by Robert "Bob" Pitoniak: They were in a lovely forested area waiting for nightfall to enter a village, and he (Bob) and PFC Bruce R. “Randy” Landis Jr. talked about how, under different circumstances, it would be a nice place to have a picnic. Dusk fell. As they came out into the rice paddies surrounding the village, all hell broke loose. The Viet Cong were lying in wait for them. Bob said, it was "like the Fourth of July." Randy was in front; Bob could no longer see him. Randy had been sent out to a point position and was hit and went down. LCPL Richard "Rick" A. Caruolo went out after Randy, and while bringing him back was also hit and later died from his wounds. Bob and some of his fellow Marines were able to reach Randy and Rick, and Bob helped carry Randy back behind the lines to the medics. He said Randy was more "John Wayne" than John Wayne ever was. Randy had been hit, first in the leg, and after he went down, in the head. They were carrying him over uneven rice paddy terrain in pitch darkness and kept slipping and falling and dropping him. Randy had stuffed his handkerchief into his mouth to keep from crying out and giving away their position. Every time they stopped they would take out the handkerchief so he could breathe, and he always insisted on putting it back in again once they resumed. When they got to the medic, Randy told the medic that he was tired and to go help the other guys. Bob never saw him again after that, but learned later that he had died. (Note: Six other Marines died during this engagement which took place during Operation Texas) [Taken from togetherweserved.com]
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.23.2014
POSTED BY: A US Marine, Vietnam

Silver Star Citation

Silver Star

Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lance Corporal Richard Anthony Caruolo (MCSN: 2011788), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action with Company K, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, in the Republic of Vietnam on 22 March 1966. At dusk Company K suddenly came under intense mortar, small-arms, machine gun, and M-79 grenade launcher fire from a well-concealed and entrenched Viet Cong Battalion near the hamlet of Phuoc Loc (1). The initial volley of enemy fire was of such vicious intensity that four members were wounded and the remainder were driven back to a shallow ditch to the rear, where they became pinned down. Noticing a seriously wounded comrade lying exposed to the hail of enemy fire forty meters to his front, Corporal Caruolo unhesitatingly jumped from his position of relative safety and ran to his aid. The wounded Marine was too heavy to lift, yet Corporal Caruolo struggled until a hospital corpsman arrived and assisted him in carrying the wounded Marine across the fire-swept ground to the vicinity of the ditch. As they halted briefly to lift him up across the embankment, a burst of enemy machine gun fire struck the group, mortally wounding Corporal Caruolo. In being the first to brave the enemy fire to evacuate wounded, Corporal Caruolo set an example followed by other Marines which resulted in the successful evacuation of all the wounded. His courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Action Date: March 22, 1966

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Lance Corporal

Company: Company K

Battalion: 3d Battalion

Regiment: 7th Marines

Division: 1st Marine Division (Rein.), FMF
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.23.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net

Remembering An American Hero

Dear LCPL Richard Anthony Caruolo, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
read more read less
POSTED ON 7.10.2012
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Richard is buried at St Ann's Cemetery, Cranston,RI.

read more read less