CLYDE W CAMPBELL
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (9)
HONORED ON PANEL 31W, LINE 99 OF THE WALL

CLYDE WILLIAM CAMPBELL

WALL NAME

CLYDE W CAMPBELL

PANEL / LINE

31W/99

DATE OF BIRTH

07/26/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/01/1969

HOME OF RECORD

LONGVIEW

COUNTY OF RECORD

Harrison County

STATE

TX

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

CAPT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR CLYDE WILLIAM CAMPBELL
POSTED ON 6.11.2017

Hero's sacrifice

Sir I'm happy that a grateful nation searched until you were recovered, as such a hero should be. In my time in vietnam as an airbase protection Security Policeman at Phan Rang and Pleiku I always loved to watching Spad's launching and landing. I'm so sorry that you didn't return that day.
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POSTED ON 5.20.2016
POSTED BY: thomas r bailey '63

The Ultimate Sacrifice was made by this Corps member, who was killed during the Vietnam War.

The Corps of Cadets and Texas A&M University
Salute: Lt. Clyde W Cambell '66
“The Memorial for Vietnam Era”
“Corps Plaza Memorial”
College Station, Texas trb’63
For more information or adding information contact:
Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center 1400 TAMU College Station, TX 77843-1400 (979) 862-2862 http://corps.tamu.edu/contact-us
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POSTED ON 5.15.2016

Final Mission of 1LT Clyde W. Campbell

1LT Clyde W. Campbell was the pilot of a Douglas A-1 Skyraider J-model “Spad” on an operational mission over Laos on March 1, 1969. His role on that day was a strike mission in northern Laos. His wingman was MAJ Harry Dunivant. Both aircraft were armed with eight 500-pound bombs. They flew to northern Xiangkhoang Province near the city of Na Khang. This area was in Military Region II and on the northern edge of the Plain of Jars region. FAC (Forward Air Control) in Laos was conducted by RAVENS, who were volunteers clandestinely stationed in Laos to support anti-communist efforts in that country. Na Khang was the location of Lima Site 36. North Vietnamese forces had been building towards an attack on Lima Site 85 (some 150 miles to the north) for several weeks. Lima 85 was the northernmost site and was the base for radar and radio equipment used to direct air traffic over North Vietnam. Lima 36, the next base south, was used at this time for a staging area. Indigenous troops were flown out of this site and aircraft could refuel here. Lima 85 was overrun and taken later on March 18, 1969. Following the fall of "the Rock", Lima Site 36 was taken. Enemy activity in Military Region II was greatly increased during this time period, and U.S. aircraft were brought in from neighboring Thailand in great numbers. At a point about 10 miles west of Na Khang, Campbell's aircraft went down. The FAC transmitted over the radio, “That A-1 just went in!” Dunivant looked down at the target area and saw a ball of fire. Neither Dunivant nor the Raven pilot saw a parachute or heard an emergency beeper. They were unsure if the aircraft had been hit by ground fire or whether he didn’t pay close enough attention to his minimum release altitude and flew the A-1 into the ground. The Air Force listed him Killed in Action, Body Not Recovered. In 1997, a joint United States-Lao People's Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.) team investigated a crash site in Houaphan Province, Laos, within 330 feet of the last known location of Campbell. In addition to human remains, the team located aircraft wreckage and military equipment, which correlated with Campbell's aircraft. From 2009 to 2010, additional joint U.S.-L.P.D.R. recovery teams investigated and excavated the crash site three times. Teams recovered additional human remains, military equipment--including an aircraft data plate--and a .38-caliber pistol matching the serial number issued to Campbell. Scientists from the JPAC used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools in the identification of Campbell. [Taken from pownetwork.org and the book Cheating Death by George J. Marrett]
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POSTED ON 7.26.2015
POSTED BY: Bobby H. Holcomb

My Faceless Hero

Finally!! After 30 years!! I have seen the face of my hero. I selected a name for my POW/MIA bracelet based on my mothers hometown of Gladewater, TX. Longview is nearby and I have family there to this day. Until this morning, I have never been able to see my "soldiers" face. I have faithfully worn that bracelet in hopes of someday sending it to the family. I want to express my deep sadness and heartfelt thanks and admiration for Capt. Clyde W. Campbell and his families sacrifice. All I was told when I received the bracelet was he had been lost over Laos, 3-1-1969. I have never, until now, known he had come home. I wish I could have attended the ceremony and left my bracelet as part of Gods blanket to rest with him eternally. I am moved to tears this has finally come to a close for me. I will never forget him, as he has been my companion for so long. I have explained all I knew about him to family, friends and strangers alike. I have mentioned him in prayer and have drank to his memory having never known him. He has always been my unseen hero. I take my bracelet off now. I had no idea when I visited Arlington National Cemetery, my hero rested there!!! Oh my!!! I would be proud and honored to mail this worn and almost unreadable bracelet to your family Captain. Your life has been part of mine. I thank Almighty God for your bravery and your answering of the call of duty. May you fly the clouds you loved to be near, forever in the Lords wings. You have my undying admiration and I will NEVER FORGET YOU!! Amen

My email address is: [email protected]

My Address is: Mr. Bobby H. Holcomb
10053 Bellflower Way
Knoxville, TN 37932
I MUST mail this to the family if they are still alive. Please contact me with an address. It has long been my mission, and I must complete it. It is the least I can do.

Thank You and God Bless,

Bobby H. Holcomb
(865) 719-1471
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POSTED ON 11.11.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear Captain Clyde William Campbell, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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