KENNETH R BROWN
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HONORED ON PANEL 1W, LINE 11 OF THE WALL

KENNETH RAY BROWN

WALL NAME

KENNETH R BROWN

PANEL / LINE

1W/11

DATE OF BIRTH

02/14/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH LONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/02/1972

HOME OF RECORD

LAS CRUCES

COUNTY OF RECORD

Dona Ana County

STATE

NM

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

SSGT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR KENNETH RAY BROWN
POSTED ON 2.14.2024
POSTED BY: Dennis Edward Wriston

I'm Proud of Our Vietnam Veterans

Staff Sergeant Kenneth Ray Brown, Served with the 18th Special Operations Squadron, 56th Special Operations Wing, 7th Air Force.
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POSTED ON 8.26.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you....

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. The remembrance from Steve Owen is touching. As long as you are remembered you will always be with us....
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POSTED ON 8.28.2017

Final Mission of SSGT Kenneth R. Brown

On May 2, 1972, a Fairchild AC-119K Stinger (#53-7826) from the 18th Special Operations Squadron was sent on a daylight mission to An Loc, Binh Long Province, RVN, to destroy some ammunition that a C-130 cargo aircraft had dropped too close to the enemy. Other Stingers flying daylight missions over the same area had encountered considerable problems avoiding anti-aircraft fire (AAA) emplacements. When 826 moved into the target area, they were joined by an O-2 spotter aircraft which would help them locate the target. The Stinger came into the target area at 4700 feet, but the weather forced them down to a dangerously low 3500 feet. As they orbited the area, they drew AAA fire which exploded above the aircraft. The crew had difficulty pinpointing their target, and with each pass they made the enemy fire came closer. On what was to be their last pass, the enemy gunner found its target, hitting the Stinger’s right wing with three or four rounds of 37mm AAA. The whole wing, from the right reciprocating engine to the jet engine, was in flames which trailed all the way back to rear crew entrance door. The right main wheel well blew open and both right engines lost all power. With only the two left engines running, and the aircraft still on fire, the plane was fast becoming uncontrollable. Pilot CAPT Terence F. Courtney applied full left rudder and full left aileron control, trying to keep the ship flying. In a very short amount of time the aircraft lost quite a bit of altitude as MAYDAY was called and a safe bailout heading sought. Courtney then yelled, “Abandon aircraft! Abandon aircraft!” Of the ten crew members aboard, seven successfully egressed the stricken aircraft. Courtney, navigator CAPT David R. Slagle, and SSGT Kenneth R. Brown apparently never made it off the aircraft and perished in the crash. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org; narrative by Craig Corbett taken from togetherweserved.com]
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POSTED ON 7.22.2017
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Thank You

Dear Ssgt Brown,
Thank you service as a Fixed Wing Crewmember. Your MOS was not given, this was all I could find. Watch over our nation, it needs your strength.Rest in Peace.
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POSTED ON 5.2.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering an American Hero

Dear SSGT Kenneth Ray Brown, sir



As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.



May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say 'thank you'; for America, and for those who love you.



With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir



Curt Carter


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