ARNOLD WOODSON
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HONORED ON PANEL 6E, LINE 88 OF THE WALL

ARNOLD WOODSON

WALL NAME

ARNOLD WOODSON

PANEL / LINE

6E/88

DATE OF BIRTH

10/29/1942

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

04/05/1966

HOME OF RECORD

NEWARK

COUNTY OF RECORD

Essex County

STATE

NJ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ARNOLD WOODSON
POSTED ON 3.21.2024
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you.....

Nor shall your glory be forgot; While fame her record keeps, Or honor points the hallowed spot; Where valor proudly sleeps.
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POSTED ON 10.29.2023
POSTED BY: Dennis Edward Wriston

I'm Proud of Our Vietnam Veterans

Specialist Four Arnold Woodson, Served with Company A, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 2.20.2023
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp4 Arnold Woodson, Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is Presidents' Day. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance, and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 3.13.2022

Final Mission of SP4 Arnold Woodson

Operation Circle Pines was a 25th Infantry Division search and destroy operation through the Filhol Rubber Plantation west of the Saigon River, about eighteen miles from the capital of Saigon in Binh Duong Province, RVN. Circle Pines began on the morning of March 29, 1966. Over the next ten days, four battalions combed their assigned sectors, hoping to push the Viet Cong (VC) up against U.S. blocking forces. Although the Americans found and destroyed enemy supplies, the VC decided in general not to fight. The one exception was an enemy attack April 5th against a company-sized overnight defensive position (NDP) about nine miles north of Cu Chi. A Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry “Wolfhounds,” one of the blocking forces for an armor unit, had unsuspectingly set up their NDP near a large VC formation. The enemy allowed the Americans to settle in, then at about a quarter past 4 AM, began mortaring the east side of the position and throwing hand grenades before launching a ground attack. Two ambush patrols outside the company perimeter were engaged by enemy moving near their location. Some of the attackers were able to reach a trench line occupied by the Wolfhounds where the fighting devolved into hand-to-hand combat. Similar assaults occurred on the northwest and southeast sides of the NDP. A Company’s commander reported to the brigade command post that they were under attack and requested illumination and artillery support. The supporting fires were received; however, the battalion commander informed A Company that they were on their own as their sister companies were out of supporting distance. The battle continued until 5:30 AM when a whistle was blown followed by the sound of a bugle, instructing the VC to withdraw. Artillery fire continued on all likely avenues of escape of the VC. By 6:50 AM, the first reinforcing units arrived at A Company’s position. After all personnel were accounted for, the company was airlifted to their base area at Cu Chi. Twelve Wolfhounds were killed in the battle and over forty wounded. The lost personnel included 2LT Thomas A. K. Blevins (died of wounds 04/06/1966), SP4 German Chaparro-Villanueva, PFC Frank De Marchi Jr., PFC Barney M. Giles Jr., SP5 Keith W. Kauffman, SP4 Daniel J. Mack, SGT Nathaniel Merriweather, SP4 Carlos J. Sanchez, PFC Edward M. Stanchek, PFC Franklin F. Weaver, PFC Scott T. Welborne, and SP4 Arnold Woodson. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “Army 1966 2-27th Inf Ops April” at ttu.edu]
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POSTED ON 10.28.2021
POSTED BY: Donna Moore

Happy Heavenly Birthday

You will forever remain in our hearts and prayers
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