MARVIN C BRIESACHER
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HONORED ON PANEL 2W, LINE 85 OF THE WALL

MARVIN CARROLL BRIESACHER

WALL NAME

MARVIN C BRIESACHER

PANEL / LINE

2W/85

DATE OF BIRTH

08/21/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

KHANH HOA

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/10/1971

HOME OF RECORD

FARMINGTON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Dakota County

STATE

MN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MARVIN CARROLL BRIESACHER
POSTED ON 3.29.2016

Ground Casualty

At the helicopter base at Dong Ba Thin, home of the 92nd Assault Helicopter Company, the enlisted men had made themselves a "club" where they could go at night and drink some beer and visit. On November 3, 1971, in what can be characterized as a racially-motivated attack, a black infantry company member went into the club with his M-16 and fired three shots from the waist before his gun jammed, at which point men in the club jumped him. Two soldiers were killed, SP4 Albin L. Kendall and SP4 Errol L. Kent. A third, SP5 Marvin C. Briesacher, was critically wounded in the lung, diaphragm, liver, and 8th vertebra of the spine. He was hospitalized where surgeons had to remove part of his lung. The perpetrator in this incident was put on a Nighthawk-crewed helicopter for removal to Cam Ranh for his own protection as “justice” was nearly served upon him by those he sought to harm. One of the Nighthawk pilots commented later that the killer laughed all the way to Cam Ranh. Following hospitalization, SP5 Briesacher’s condition improved and for a time he was able to write letters home to his parents. However, on Thanksgiving Day 1971, he became paralyzed from the waist down and underwent surgery for an abscessed liver. His condition deteriorated and he died December 10, 1971. [Some details of this incident were provided by Richard Harris; other info comes from coffeltdatabase.org and the Dakota County Tribune (Farmington, MN) December 16, 1971]
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POSTED ON 3.22.2016

Ground Casualty

SP5 Marvin C. Briesacher, SP4 Albin L. Kendall, and SP4 Errol L. Kent were aircraft mechanics serving with the 10th Aviation Battalion in Khanh Hoa Province, RVN. On November 3, 1971, they were in an enlisted men’s club when a guard went berserk and opened fire on the soldiers. Kendall and Kent were killed and Briesacher was critically wounded in the lung, diaphragm, liver, and 8th vertebra of the spine. He was hospitalized where surgeons had to remove part of his lung. His condition improved and for a time he was able to write letters home to his parents. However, on Thanksgiving Day 1971, he had become paralyzed from the waist down and underwent surgery for an abscessed liver. His condition deteriorated and he died December 10, 1971. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and the Dakota County Tribune (Farmington, MN) December 16, 1971]
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POSTED ON 2.16.2015
POSTED BY: Shirley Maier

High school pals

Marv and I were good friends during our high school years. We drove around town together and enjoyed laughing....his smile and laugh have stayed with me. As Bob Dylan said, Marvin will remain "forever young" to me. His death was so inconceivable. It put a personal and sorrowful face on a war that had already claimed many innocent lives by 1971.
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POSTED ON 1.26.2015
POSTED BY: Randy Kath

A guy I looked up to.

I first met Marvin when I was about 14 and Marvin was a senior in HS. Marvin was one of the cool guys, but would take the time to talk to a kid. He was just that way. The news of his death was shocking to this small town kid. He was a good man and was greatly missed.
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POSTED ON 11.18.2014
POSTED BY: John Lund

Friends Forever

Growing up together in Farmington, Mn in the 1960s we biked the entire town most everyday leaving me with many fond memories. When we received our license we drove the town and many miles together, had a lot of laughs and good times - the stories we could tell. As a groomsman at my wedding Feb. 3 1968 it was the last time I saw you. The war separated us as I served 3 tours of duty aboard an aircraft carrier until June 1971. I treasure our memories.
Friends Forever
John Lund
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