JERRY G BRIDGES
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HONORED ON PANEL 40W, LINE 6 OF THE WALL

JERRY GLEN BRIDGES

WALL NAME

JERRY G BRIDGES

PANEL / LINE

40W/6

DATE OF BIRTH

01/07/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

KHANH HOA

DATE OF CASUALTY

10/20/1968

HOME OF RECORD

COLUMBIA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Maury County

STATE

TN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SSGT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JERRY GLEN BRIDGES
POSTED ON 10.16.2014

Final Mission of SP4 Jerry G. Bridges

The CH-47 "Chinook" helicopter was one of the workhorses of the Army's air fleet. As a cargo lift, the Chinook could carry up to 28,000 pounds on its external cargo hook, and is credited with the recovery of 11,500 disabled aircraft worth more than $3 billion. As troop carrier, the aircraft could be fitted with 24 litters for medical evacuation, or carry 33-44 troops in addition to the crew. On one occasion, a Chinook evacuated 147 refugees and their possessions on a single flight. The Chinook could be outfitted for bombing missions, dropping tear gas or napalm in locations fixed wing aircraft could not reach. The big bird could carry a large cargo of supplies. On October 20, 1968, aircraft commander CW3 Charles E. Deitsch, pilot WO1 Henry C. Knight, crewchief SP5 Charles H. Meldahl, flight engineer SP4 Jerry G. Bridges, and door gunner SP4 Ronald Stanton departed Dong Ba Thien Airfield, South Vietnam, in a CH-47A helicopter (serial #66-19053) on a resupply mission to Ban Me Thuot, South Vietnam. Deitsch radioed at 0700 hours on October 20 that his aircraft was over the Ninh Hoa Valley. That was the last anyone heard of the CH-47. At about 0800 hours, it was determined that the helicopter was overdue. An intensive search effort was made, but no wreckage was ever found of the CH-47, and search efforts were concluded on October 28. Villagers were later canvassed throughout the Ninh Ho Valley, and literature was distributed asking about the crash of the Chinook, but no new information was ever discovered. Between 1984 and 1994,Vietnamese residents and refugees offered information and material evidence potentially linked with the crash. In 1994, the crash site was located and in 1995, during the 33rd Joint Field Activity, the site was excavated, yielding additional information. In October 2000, the investigation was completed and it determined that all members of the crew went down with the helicopter and did not survive the crash. All of the crew was also identified through DNA. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
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POSTED ON 10.6.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SSGT Jerry Glen Bridges, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 10.25.2012

Never Forgotten

(Photo Credit: his family)



Rest in peace with the warriors.

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POSTED ON 2.4.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Jerry is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
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POSTED ON 3.25.2009
POSTED BY: Beckie Schuster

To My lifelong hero

I was in Clark Air Force Base Phillippenes, when the first POW/MIA bracelets were issued and I received the name of SSGT Jerry Glen Bridges. I faithfully wore his bracelet for over 25 years and still have it to this day. I will be going to Giles County Tennessee very soon to pay personal homage to my hero and give him my thanks personally for his ultimate sacrifice. Thank God that his remains were found, thank God that his family was able to lay him to rest close to home.
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