HAROLD D WILLIAMS
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HONORED ON PANEL 20W, LINE 84 OF THE WALL

HAROLD DAVID WILLIAMS

WALL NAME

HAROLD D WILLIAMS

PANEL / LINE

20W/84

DATE OF BIRTH

10/29/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH THUAN

DATE OF CASUALTY

08/01/1969

HOME OF RECORD

LOS ANGELES

COUNTY OF RECORD

Los Angeles County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SSGT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR HAROLD DAVID WILLIAMS
POSTED ON 3.1.2005
POSTED BY: E Co Lrp & C Co Rgr Assoc Historian

Ranger

Ranger
Request the attached photo replace the unit patch that was mistakenly put there.We would like to have a "FACE with a NAME".
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POSTED ON 8.20.2003
POSTED BY: Rick Grimes

Airborne Ranger

I posted this not-very-good photo of Harold Williams a few years ago on this site and left a remembrance which has disappeared. I was "Ranger" Williams' platoon leader. He was the leader of Team 25, C Co. 75th Infantry, Airborne Rangers.

The short story is that he earned the second highest honor, the Distinguished Service Cross. The 5 man team walked into a base camp for an NVA Battalion and it started one of the biggest battles of 1969. Leppelman, Fry, Walthers, Hoa (Kit Carson Scout), and Williams. I was overhead coordinating fire support in an O-1 Birddog.

As his team was being overrun during a fierce firefight (in which Frank Walthers was killed), Williams repeatedly requested gunship support right on top of his position. I remember the gunship pilots requesting affirmation from him with each run. All were wounded in the firefight and/or from schrapnel from the helicopter rocket launchers and mini-guns.

While I had an American reaction force (a platoon of infantrymen) landing on a mountain top and slugging their way down to the team, I tried to insert a company of ARVN's in the valley so they could fight their way up to the team. The American pilots were screaming to me that the ARVN's would not get out of the helicopters so I told them to have their door gunners throw them out--and they did! Unfortunately, the ARVN's set up a perimeter and didn't move til the next morning.

The American platoon fought their way down to the Ranger team and spent the night alone without the ARVN support. Sometime in the early evening, I was called by the platoon leader of the reaction force and told that Williams went to secure a radio from a dropped backpack and was wounded again. The platoon leader gave me the impression that he was only slightly wounded.

At daybreak, the team was extracted. I met the helicopters on the tarmac. (Phan Thiet). Only three Rangers got off the helicopters. As I helped carry Fry to a stretcher, I asked, "Where's Ranger Williams?" His reply: "He's dead, sir."
They brought Williams and Walthers out later that day.

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