FREDERICK T WILLIAMS
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HONORED ON PANEL 41E, LINE 33 OF THE WALL

FREDERICK THOMAS WILLIAMS

WALL NAME

FREDERICK T WILLIAMS

PANEL / LINE

41E/33

DATE OF BIRTH

03/11/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

DINH TUONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/25/1968

HOME OF RECORD

NEW YORK

COUNTY OF RECORD

New York City

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR FREDERICK THOMAS WILLIAMS
POSTED ON 5.27.2014
POSTED BY: Linda Whitelaw Davis

r

Every year on Memorial Day I stop to think of all the men and women who were killed in the service. My brother George Whitelaw was in the same company as you and was also killed that day. God bless your family. Linda Whitelaw Davis
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POSTED ON 12.16.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear PFC Frederick Thomas Williams, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 3.13.2010
POSTED BY: Bill nelson

NEVER FORGOTTEN

FIRE SUPPORT BASE JAEGER

near Cai Lay

Stars and Stripes

Feb 27th 1968



Fighting from behind a wagon train circle made of armored vehicles, U.S. infantrymen of the 5th Bn (Mech) 60th Inf stood off an attack by 500 hundred Viet Cong who tried to overrun their patrol base and seize heavy artillery, thus blocking the rice life line between Saigon and the Mekong Delta. The pre-dawn battle at Fire Support Base Jaeger took place 42 miles southwest of Saigon, lasting 4 and a half hours.

The enemy attack wilted under counterattacks from infantry reinforcements, helicopter gun ships and outside artillery. But U.S. losses were heavy and damage to the base was extensive.



American losses were 20 killed and 70 wounded. Among the dead was the patrol base commander.



The U.S. command reported 100 Viet Cong killed in the assault on the 200 man patrol base of the 9th Infantry Division, the unit charged with keeping open Highway 4 which carries rice and other essential goods to the capitol of Saigon.



About 60 of the Viet Cong penetrated the base's western perimeter and managed for a while to take over a 155mm artillery piece. Heavy American counter fire drove the enemy away before they could turn it on the defenders or haul it away.



In the enemy's covering mortar and rocket fire 11 armored vehicles were destroyed.



The attack began shortly after midnight with a Communist feint from the east. Then the main attack came from the west.



Field dispatches said the 16 armored vehicles drew into a circle around the 4 artillery pieces to stand off a human wave attack by the Viet Cong, when they had blasted their way through barbed wire on the western perimeter with Bangalore torpedoes.



Spec 4 Ralph Hirshler of Lamar, Colorado manned a .50 caliber machine gun on an armored vehicle. "They just kept coming over the rice paddy dikes and I kept heaving lead at them," he said. "I must have fired 1000 rounds in 10 minutes."



One of the attackers killed the company commander and Lt. Stanley Nowach, of St. Louis, a Forward Observer, took command.



The fight was touched off when the U.S. company spotted 12 Viet Cong moving toward the perimeter from the east shortly after midnight. The American troops opened up with machine gun fire and sent out four armored personnel carriers to sweep the area. The lead carrier was hit by rocket fire. Then the Viet Cong opened up from the southwest and northwest, then sent the bulk of its force storming into the western perimeter. Recon Platoon tried to break through to the encircled company but was attacked en route. Four of the armored personnel carriers of Recon Platoon finally drove through along with another infantry company.



"It was obviously coordinated to overrun the four artillery guns," an officer said.





The battle actually cost 22 American lives:



B Co, 15th Eng Bn:

SGT Robert L. Simmons, Ridgeway, SC

SP4 Joe H. Brown, Jackson, MS

CPL Ronnie L. Clark, Hugoton, KS

CPL Larry A. De La Rosa, Baldwin Park, CA

CPL Dennis E. Lane, Wilton, CA

PFC William L. Newsome, New Rochelle, NY





A Btry, 1st Bn, 11th Arty Rgt:

SP4 Stanley O. Johnson, Cincinnati, OH





B Co, 5th Bn, 60th Inf Rgt:

CPT Daniel R. Schueren, Arlington Heights, IL

SP4 James C. Blount, Columbus, GA

SP4 Edward Singleton, Baltimore, MD

PFC Richard B. Mc Daniel, San Mateo, CA





C Co, 5th Bn, 60th Inf Rgt:

CPL Maxie E. Ackerman, Saginaw, MI

CPL Manuelito L. Herrera, Manassa, CO

CPL Richard M. Scala, New York, NY

CPL George D. Whitelaw, East Detroit, MI

PFC Leslie R. Lewis, Chicago, IL

PFC Gearwin P. Tousey, Green Bay, WI

PFC Frederick T. Williams, New York, NY





HHC, 5th Bn, 60th Inf Rgt:

2LT Gordon K. Hughes, Upper Sandusky, OH

SP4 Michael C. Zeller, Wamego, KS

PFC Michael D. Sheahan, Tujunga, CA





B Btry, 1st Bn, 84th Arty Rgt:

PFC Earl E. Parker, Portsmouth, VA
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POSTED ON 11.2.2005
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson

Never Forgotten

FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heros you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you, one of the gentle heros lost to the War in Vietnam:

Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul ... and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From your Nam-Band-Of-Brothers
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POSTED ON 2.25.2004
POSTED BY: Kayla Porzelius

Thank You

Dear Frederick Williams,
As an American and a student of the Gridley High School Posting Project, I want to thank you for all you did for our country. Without men and women like you, our lives as we know it would not be the same. May God be with you at all times.

God Bless,
Kayla Porzelius
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