HAROLD E WILKINS
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HONORED ON PANEL 3E, LINE 48 OF THE WALL

HAROLD EUGENE WILKINS

WALL NAME

HAROLD E WILKINS

PANEL / LINE

3E/48

DATE OF BIRTH

09/19/1942

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/12/1965

HOME OF RECORD

VALE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Lincoln County

STATE

NC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR HAROLD EUGENE WILKINS
POSTED ON 1.4.2009
POSTED BY: Arnold M. Huskins

Second newspaper article

Family of Slain Soldier Stunned by the Tragedy

by Jerry Bayliff
Lincoln Times-News
17 November 1965

Mrs. C.B. Wilkens (sic) has been married for 27 years. Her husband drives a truck and their family consists of five girls.

Before last Friday...they had a son.

Now that son, Harold, is dead, the victim of Communist mortar fire in South Viet Nam. The 23-year-old Wilkens was the first man from Lincoln County to be fatally wounded in that far off, bloody, battleground.

An old, unpainted, house sitting in a grove of trees in the North Brook III community is the Wilkens' family home. The wind whistled around and through that house Tuesday afternoon and its moan reminded of the sounds of death.

Mr. Wilkens sat in a chair in the small living room and didn't say much. Mrs. Wilkens talked of her son; what he was like and how he lived; and the pain and sorrow in her voice made the wind seem friendly by comparison. "He wasn't like other boys. He was nice and quiet and like to stay around home," she said.

Harold graduated from Newbold High School in 1962 and worked for a while at Guy Frye Trucking Company in Hickory and worked for a short time at the Country Club in Asheville.

The young man liked electronics and took a correspondence course in
the field. He also like to draw but never studied the subject.

The streak of white in her hair accentuarting her sad memories, Mrs. Wilkens said, "He was a good boy. He was brought up in the Church of God and attended Sunday School and church."

Wilkens' sister said that he did not have many close friends and did not run around "with the crowd. That's why he was different," she said.

Harold was home for about a week last December before Christmas. He didn't come home often because he had to ride buses for long distances and after he arrived in Lincolnton he would always have to catch a cab for the long ride out to western Lincoln County.

The young man had been drafted into the Army and was due for release from the service next March when his two year hitch was up.

Harold's body will be home in 10 days to two weeks and he will be burried in the Lawndale Church of God cemetery. A full military escort and funeral will be provided by the Army.

Know ye well, my friend...that little family in the rambshackled house in that small grove of trees have paid a price for us all.
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POSTED ON 1.4.2009
POSTED BY: Arnold M. Huskins

Initial newspaper report

Victim of Mortar Fire
Lincoln County Man is Killed in Viet Nam Attack

Lincoln Times-News
15 November 1965

"Mom, I'm not in California. I'm in Viet Nam and I'm tired of living in this graveyard. I don't like it all."

Army SP/4 Harold Wilkens, (sic), a native of Lincoln County, wrote those words to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.B. Wilens of Route 2, Vale, in one his last letters home.

His parents received word late Saturday that their son had died of mortar wounds Friday in South Viet Nam where was serving with the First Cavalry Division.

The telegram from the Department of the Army said that the 23-year-old Wilkens was killed when his defensive position came under mortar attack from the Communists.

Wilkens is the first man from Lincoln County to be killed in the fighting in South Viet Nam.

Young Wilkens had been in the Army almost two years, his parents said. He was their only son. There are four girls in the family.

The telegram read in part, "Your son died in Viet Nam on 12 November as a result of mutiple fragments causing wounds of the body while his outfit was in a defensive position and came under mortar attack from the Communists."

Wilkens' outfit had been the backbone of the Army's offensive action in Viet Nam. New sources said today (Monday) that the First Cav was now doing battle with the Communists in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam near the Cambodian border.

Wilkens' mother said her son told her he was working in a supply capacity.

Harold had attended Newbold High School in Lincolnton before going into the Army. His father, who works for a Hickory trucking firm, said his son drove a truck for a short time before entering the service. He had been in Viet Nam for several months, according to his mother. She said her son was 23 years old on Sept. 23.

The family lives near North Brook III school.

Mrs. Macie Beaman, Lincoln Veterans Service officer, said the body will be flown back to Lincoln County with a full military escort in the next several days.

E.F. Drum and Sons Funeral Home will be in charge of arrangements.
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POSTED ON 11.21.2006
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson Nam Vet 101st Airborne

NEVER FORGOTTEN


FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you , one of the gentle heroes lost to the War in Vietnam:
Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul....and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From all your "Band of Nam Brothers"
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POSTED ON 11.20.2006
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson Nam Vet 101st Airborne

NEVER FORGOTTEN


FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you , one of the gentle heroes lost to the War in Vietnam:
Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul....and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From all your "Band of Nam Brothers"
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POSTED ON 11.12.2003
POSTED BY: Bethany Witzig

Dear Soldier

Dear Soldier,
I am a student at Gridley High School. As a history project we are writing remembrances for every Vietnam soldier that does not have one.

God bless you and your family for your sacrifice.

Bethany Witzig
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