DOUGLAS W WILKIE
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HONORED ON PANEL 19W, LINE 57 OF THE WALL

DOUGLAS WILMER WILKIE

WALL NAME

DOUGLAS W WILKIE

PANEL / LINE

19W/57

DATE OF BIRTH

02/13/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

TAY NINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

08/17/1969

HOME OF RECORD

LANSING

COUNTY OF RECORD

Eaton County

STATE

MI

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DOUGLAS WILMER WILKIE
POSTED ON 3.12.2024
POSTED BY: John Fabris

do not stand at my grave and weep.....

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there. I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry;
I am not there. I did not die.
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POSTED ON 1.6.2023
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp5 Douglas Wilkie, Thank you for your service as a Medical NCO. Thank you for the lives you saved. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is the Epiphany. Merry Christmas & Happy New Year. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance, and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 2.18.2019

Attack on FSB Santa Barbara – August 17, 1969

Fire Support Base Santa Barbara was located to the north of Nui Ba Den mountain in Tay Ninh Province, RVN. In the early morning of August 17, 1969, FSB Santa Barbara was attacked by a North Vietnamese Army force. Beginning at 3:25 AM, the base was hit by mortar and rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) fire from the north and northwest followed by a ground assault which reached the berm but did not penetrate the perimeter. The attack was held off with organic weapons (rifles, machine guns, grenades, etc.), Claymore mines, a UH-1H Nighthawk helicopter gunship, and artillery. Twenty-one of the enemy were killed and two AK-47 rifles and three RPG launchers were captured. Battlefield litter and its proximity suggested that the enemy unit was probably a sapper element of the 1st NVA Division. Three Americans were killed and eight wounded in the defense of the base. The lost U.S. personnel included SSG Frank A. Frangella, SP4 Vernon D. Southerland, and SP5 Douglas W. Wilkie. Frangella was posthumously award the Silver Star medal for his actions during the battle. The following is a personal account of Frangella’s bravery by Steve Green: “I was a radio operator for Alpha Battery, 2/32 Arty where SSG Frangella was a cook. In the morning of the 17th, the 25th Infantry was pulling guard on our berm. About 3 AM, we began to receive heavy rocket and mortar fire. The infantry panicked and immediately fled, leaving behind one of their wounded and an unprotected 107mm recoilless rifle on the berm which was now occupied by the NVA. While the rest of us were trying to figure out what was happening, SSG Frangella ran alone to the east berm and drove the enemy back down the other side of the berm. He then climbed up on top of the recoilless position and was returning fire when I came out of my bunker. It was reported that he died of multiple fragmentation wounds, but I say he was shot in the head by a cover team for the sappers that were trying to blow our #2 ammo bunker with an RPG. SSG Frangella not only kept that from happening, but he also kept the NVA from turning that 107mm recoilless around and killing us all. The reason the enemy was able to kill him was he had to lean out over the edge of his fighting position to get a line of sight on that enemy soldier with the RPG, thus exposing himself to their rifleman. It wasn't until we saw him roll down the hill that we knew what to do. We then took grenades and lobbed them over the berm and drove them back into the minefield. Somebody, probably our Captain, shot the NVA with the RPG and killed him. But had it not been SSG Frangella, holding them back at the cost of his own life just long enough for us to get it together, a lot of us would have died. I know I would be dead. He knew what he was doing but, in his mind, he had no choice, there was no one else around and he had to take the chance. SSG Frangella looked like anything but a soldier, but he was so fierce in combat, he drove back an entire sapper team by himself. Like Jesus cleansing the temple. I have now enjoyed 51 years of life instead of the 17 it would have been if not for you. May I call you Frank now, Sarge? Thanks for putting yourself between a bunch of frightened kids and certain death, Frank. Never again have I witnessed such an awesome sight. How many of us did you save that night? For this I don't need the Pope's permission, for what saint has ever done more than this? St. Frank!” Frangella was also posthumously promoted to Sergeant First Class. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Steve Green (July 2001) at thewall-usa.com]
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POSTED ON 8.17.2018
POSTED BY: Janice Current

An American Hero

Thank you for your service and your sacrifice. Thank you for stepping up and answering your country's call. Rest easy knowing you will never be forgotten.
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POSTED ON 8.17.2015
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Vet

Thank You

Thank you Spec 5 Wilkie for your leadership and courage under fire.
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