STEPHEN H WARNER
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HONORED ON PANEL 5W, LINE 104 OF THE WALL

STEPHEN HENRY WARNER

WALL NAME

STEPHEN H WARNER

PANEL / LINE

5W/104

DATE OF BIRTH

02/21/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/14/1971

HOME OF RECORD

SKILLMAN

COUNTY OF RECORD

Somerset County

STATE

NJ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STEPHEN HENRY WARNER
POSTED ON 6.18.2020
POSTED BY: Greg Waters

Stephen Warner Exhibit

"As You Were: Words and Images from Vietnam" is currently on display at the New Jersey Vietnam Era Museum in Holmdel, New Jersey. This exhibit tells Stephen Warner's story through the photographs that he took and the words that he wrote while serving in Vietnam. It will be on display until February 2020. Please visit our website - www.njvvmf.org - for additional information
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POSTED ON 9.3.2019
POSTED BY: Marcus Byrne

Current 7th MPAD Commander

I discovered this memorial while doing research. I am the current commander of the 7th Public Affairs Detachment (Mobile). I was researching the unit history to see which campaigns we participated in and to know a little more about the work the unit had done historically to inform my soldiers. If you are a veteran of the 7th PID I would like to hear your story. It's important we remember those who came before us, like Stephen Warner, and connect with our lineage just as every other unit does. You can contact me via email below. Thanks --MAJ Marcus D. Byrne, 7th MPAD.
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POSTED ON 12.3.2018
POSTED BY: Tim Tetz

From the Gettysburgian . . .

Specialist Stephen Henry Warner graduated with the Gettysburg College Class of 1968. During his time at Gettysburg (1964-1968), Warner was a member of the service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega, and wrote regularly for The Gettysburgian, eventually becoming the editor of the features section. He was incredibly vocal in his opposition to the war, serving on a committee of students opposed to the war, and using his platform at the newspaper to further spread his thoughts about American involvement in Vietnam. After graduating, Warner continued his education at Yale Law School but was drafted into the Army after his first year. He began his tour in Vietnam on March 21, 1970 as an Information Specialist in Squadron 3 of the 5TH Cavalry Regiment, serving under the command of the 101st Airborne. SP4 Warner was killed in action 11 months into his tour, on February 14, 1971, in the Quang Tri region of Vietnam. Before his death, he bequeathed his records of the war to Musselman Library, which keeps the Stephen H. Warner Memorial Collection. His accounts have been compiled into a book called Killed in Action: The life and times of SP4 Stephen H. Warner, draftee, journalist, and anti-war activist, written by Arthur J. Amchan.
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POSTED ON 4.7.2017

Final Mission of SP4 Stephen H. Warner

Operation Lam Son 719 was a South Vietnamese army push into Laos between February 8th and March 25th, 1971, to disrupt supply buildups of the North Vietnamese Army there. The United States provided logistical, aerial, and artillery support to the operation, but its ground forces were prohibited by law from entering Laotian territory. On February 14, 1971, SGT Richard D. Covert Jr., SP5 Paul G. Bright, PFC Ronald C. Ruff, and SP4 Stephen H. Warner, an Army journalist, were riding in an M113 armored personnel carrier (APC) in support of the operation near the east slope Hill 558, about three miles northwest of Khe Sanh Airfield in Quang Tri Province, RVN. Their APC was headed to a wooded area from where small arms gunfire was being received when the track was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade. The attack killed Covert, Ruff, and Warner, and critically injured Bright. He was evacuated to a U.S. military hospital where he expired on March 2, 1971. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by John Pecoraro]
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POSTED ON 12.18.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP4 Stephen Henry Warner, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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