JAMES H WARD
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HONORED ON PANEL 33W, LINE 35 OF THE WALL

JAMES HOWARD WARD

WALL NAME

JAMES H WARD

PANEL / LINE

33W/35

DATE OF BIRTH

05/13/1945

CASUALTY PROVINCE

HUA NGHIA

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/01/1969

HOME OF RECORD

HOMEWOOD

COUNTY OF RECORD

Cook County

STATE

IL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JAMES HOWARD WARD
POSTED ON 7.19.2019
POSTED BY: wkillian@smjuhsd.org

Final Mission of SP5 James H. Ward

Final Mission of SP5 James H. Ward
On February 1, 1969, a U.S. Army helicopter UH-1D (tail number 66-00845) from the 190th Assault Helicopter Company crashed at the helipad of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) 30th Engineer Battalion in Hoc Mon, RVN. Three Americans and three ARVN passengers were killed in the incident. The lost U.S. personnel were pilot WO1 Jackson D. Barnes and passengers CPT Thomas E. Nichols and SP5 James H. Ward. Three others were injured. The incident occurred after the helicopter landed at the 30th ARVN Engineer Battalion helipad at approximately 1:40 PM with the three passengers on board. Four more passengers with some baggage were loaded on the UH-1D. The aircraft commander brought the helicopter to a hover in the northern corner of the helipad. The aircraft hovered at eight to ten feet above the ground for a period of two to three minutes. It was assumed that a hover-check was being conducted and the direction of the wind being assessed. The takeoff was made by aircraft commander who was sitting in the left seat of the aircraft. Without setting the aircraft on the ground, the helicopter took off directly into the wind, slightly to the left of a 40-foot tall flagpole. After the aircraft had traveled about 130 feet, its main rotor struck the flagpole which was constructed of a four-inch steel pipe with a faded yellow Vietnamese flag flying at its top. The strike caused the main transmission to be torn loose from the aircraft and the helicopter fell to the ground, landing on its right side. The tail boom was broken on impact and the engine continued to run at a high rpm after impact. The crew chief was unable to turn it off with the throttle or fuel switch. The aircraft did not burn due to the fact that personnel from the 30th Engineer compound used several fire extinguishers on it. The engine finally stopped about five to ten minutes after impact by the crew chief spraying a CO2 fire extinguisher into the engine inlet. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and vhpa.org]
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POSTED ON 11.6.2017
POSTED BY: Jerry Richmond

National Reading of the Names

You are not forgotten. I have the honor of reading your name at the 35th Anniversary of the Vietnam Wall. 11/8/2017 @19:08. RIP and thank you.
From a Nam brother
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POSTED ON 9.6.2016
POSTED BY: Daryl Berg

My roommate at College

Jim was my roommate freshman year at Bethel College St Paul MN in 1963. I had just returned from Japan after spending ten years in a small missionary school. Jim was a great roommate for this transition in my life. I served with The Old Guard - Fort Myer - 1968-69. We did funerals daily at Arlington Cemetery. 47 years later I plan to visit the wall in DC this week and find Jim's name.
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POSTED ON 6.17.2015
POSTED BY: Craig Flanders

One of my heros

Always a smile at school. We served at the same time, different provinces, went to high school together, I made it back, he stayed.....god rest his soul
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POSTED ON 11.8.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP5 James Howard Ward, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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