MICHAEL P VULLO
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HONORED ON PANEL 8W, LINE 10 OF THE WALL

MICHAEL PHILLIP VULLO

WALL NAME

MICHAEL P VULLO

PANEL / LINE

8W/10

DATE OF BIRTH

11/17/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

TAY NINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/11/1970

HOME OF RECORD

ALHAMBRA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Los Angeles County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MICHAEL PHILLIP VULLO
POSTED ON 10.10.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp4 Michael Vullo, Thank you for your service as a Weapons Support Radar Repairer Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Today we celebrate Columbus Day. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 3.10.2022
POSTED BY: Alfred Coppa

Just remembering You

I was thinking about you today. You and I were throwing a basketball back and forth at East L.A. Junior college early one morning in about 1969 0r 70. That was the last time that I remember talking to you. I remembered you from Mr. Wilson's electronics class also. You sat just in front of me. AL
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POSTED ON 10.23.2018

Final Mission of SP4 Michael P. Vullo

At approximately 6:40 PM on July 10, 1970, a U.S. Army helicopter CH-47A (tail number 65-07999) from the 242nd Aviation Battalion was hovering at a spot seven miles southeast of Dau Tieng in Tay Ninh Province, RVN, when it was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade and crashed. Two crewmen and seven passengers were killed in the incident. The aircraft was hovering approximately 50 feet above a load of empty fuel blivits after having just picked up fifteen 25th Infantry Division passengers at a firebase called “the Mushroom,” named so because it was located in a mushroom-shaped loop of a river. The rocket struck the Chinook in the rear pylon, causing the fuselage to break apart and the cockpit to fall separately from the main fuselage. When the fuselage section hit ground, it caught fire. The left door gunner, SP4 David P. Schultz, was killed on impact. The flight engineer, SP4 Ross E. Bedient, was able to escape the burning aircraft; however, he was critically burned, and died three days later. The seven lost passengers included SFC Thomas A. Campbell; SP4 Roy E. Harris (died at the U.S. Army burn center at Camp Zama in Japan on July 26, 1970); SP4 Dennis K. Martin (his remains were recovered from the charred wreckage and identified five days later); SGT Robert L. Oldham, SGT Carey J. Pratt (succumbed to his injuries July 12, 1970), SFC Elroy Simmons (died at the U.S. Army burn center at Camp Zama in Japan on July 19, 1970); and SP4 Michael P. Vullo (expired the following day). The aircraft commander and co-pilot escaped the cockpit by crawling out through the outside air temperature gauge window. Both suffered minor injuries, but neither were burned. Another nine persons survived with injuries. Martin was posthumously promoted to Sergeant, and Pratt was posthumously promoted to Staff Sergeant. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and vhpa.org]
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POSTED ON 7.30.2015
POSTED BY: Thomas Pratt

Thank you for your service and ultimate sacrifice.

Sp4 Vullo was a passenger on the same helicopter as my brother Ssgt. Carey J. Pratt, that was shot down on 10 July 1970. Sp4 Vullo died the following day, 11 July 1970, and my brother died on 12 July 1970, of injuries received in the crash.

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POSTED ON 7.11.2015
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP4 Michael Phillip Vullo, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
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