WAYNE G VAN LANT
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HONORED ON PANEL 24E, LINE 57 OF THE WALL

WAYNE G VAN LANT

WALL NAME

WAYNE G VAN LANT

PANEL / LINE

24E/57

DATE OF BIRTH

04/27/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/31/1967

HOME OF RECORD

ARTESIA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Los Angeles County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WAYNE G VAN LANT
POSTED ON 10.19.2013
POSTED BY: Bob Ahles, Vietnam Vet, St. Cloud, Minnesota

Peace with Honor

You were one of the brave that answered the call. You honored us by your service and sacrifice. We now honor you each time we stand and sing the words “THE LAND OF THE FREE AND THE HOME OF THE BRAVE”. Rest in peace and honor Wayne.
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POSTED ON 7.31.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP4 Wayne G Van Lant, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 12.19.2012

Summary of Mid-Air Collision of U.S. Army helicopters UH-1C tail numbers 66-00710 and 66-00707

The subject helicopters were gunships on a night reconnaissance mission in an area south and west of Phu Hiep AAF, RVN. The crew of 66-707 included aircraft commander 1LT Robert M. Wallace, pilot 1LT James R. Poggemeyer, crew chief SP4 Wayne G. Van Lant, and gunner PFC Douglas R. Noel. Helicopter 66-710 was crewed by aircraft commander WO1 Rodney O. Davie, pilot CW2 Henry C. Cauthen Sr., crew chief SP5 Joseph W. Allwood, and gunner SP4 Paul E. Williams. At a point 2.1 miles southwest of the Phu Hiep complex, the two helicopters lost contact with each other, resulting in a mid-air collision at approximately 2345 hours. Both aircraft were totally destroyed in the resultant crash and fire. There were no survivors. The two gunships became separated while approaching the RVN compound, one half mile northwest of the crash site. Helicopter 66-707 circled to the left. This fact is borne right from the statement of one witness, that the aircraft he was trying to follow appeared to be further away, as the sound moved west and south. Also the radio transmission between the two aircraft indicated that 66-707 was in a left turn. After the first pass over the area, helicopter 66-710 circled left toward the bridge and then turned back right over the bridge and to the southeast. At the time the two helicopters collided in the air, 66-710 was on a heading somewhere between 140 degrees and 180 degrees. Helicopter 66-707 was at a heading somewhere between 320 degrees and 360 degrees. At the point of contact, it is assumed that 66-710 was turning away from 66-707 or 66-707 was turning away from 66-710. This fact is evidenced by the rotor blade marks on the left door of 66-710. It was a glancing blow with the underside of the rotor blade, marking the door. The force of 66-707 striking 66-710 and the resultant vibration caused the transmission and rotor head to become separated. The transmission fell straight down, or nearly straight down. The rotor blade and head, having some aerodynamic characteristic, fell south of the point of mid-air collision. Helicopter 66-707 became a flaming ball falling to the southeast. Witnesses stated they saw the burning wreckage falling to their left, which some believed to be to the north. Helicopter 66-710 did not burn until after ground impact. Parts of 66-710 fell in the general direction of south, with the main wreckage making contact with the ground at a heading 160 degrees. The helicopter struck a rice paddy dike, flipped around, causing the engine to tear loose, and continue another 25 feet. The helicopter burst into flames at, or shortly after, ground contact. The pilot in the left seat of 66-710 was thrown clear along with the pilots seat shortly after the mid-air collision. He became separated from the seat prior to ground contact. [Taken from vhpa.org]

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POSTED ON 11.27.2012

SP4 Wayne G. Van Lant

SP4 Wayne G. Van Lant (Image courtesy of Jay Van Lant)

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POSTED ON 8.6.2012
POSTED BY: Jay Van Lant

To My Uncle Wayne

Wayne was my Uncle. He was only 7 years older than me and we were very close. I have his picture on my Living Room wall and will have it scanned and placed on this page for him

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