FREDRICK L THROWER
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HONORED ON PANEL 25E, LINE 111 OF THE WALL

FREDRICK LAMAR THROWER

WALL NAME

FREDRICK L THROWER

PANEL / LINE

25E/111

DATE OF BIRTH

08/25/1933

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LAM DONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/04/1967

HOME OF RECORD

PINE BLUFF

COUNTY OF RECORD

Jefferson County

STATE

AR

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

TSGT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR FREDRICK LAMAR THROWER
POSTED ON 11.8.2023
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you....

Some may think you are forgotten
Though on earth you are no more
But in our memory you are with us
As you always were before….
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POSTED ON 7.31.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Tsgt Fredrick Thrower, Thank you for your service with the 8th Aerial Port Squadron. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Today is the 69th anniversary of the Korean War Armistice.. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it still needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 2.18.2022
POSTED BY: Jay Priest

Uncle Lamar Thrower

Fredrick Lamar Thrower
TSGT Fredrick Lamar Thrower was one among four men who lost their lives in the greatest single combat loss of Combat Controllers on 4 September 1967. The element of CCT was a member of the 8th Aerial Port Squadron out of Bien Hoa, Vietnam and was under the leadership of MSGT Charles A. Paradise. The CCT element was being transported on a mission aboard an Air Commando C-123 K Provider #54-0621. Their mission was to relieve another 4 man CCT element that was providing support for an Army Special Forces Team at a remote airstrip near Dong Hoi, South Vietnam. The aircraft did not arrive at the scheduled destination. Search and rescue efforts eventually located the downed aircraft. While the exact cause of the crash of the C-123 is unknown (either mechanical failure or enemy fire) it is widely accepted by many who investigated the crash that it was a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire since the cockpit had AAA caliber holes and no “may-day” call issued. All aboard were KIA. Lost were MSGT Charles Paradise, TSGT Fredrick Thrower, A1C Gerald Gauthier, and A1C William Jerkins. TSGT Fredrick Thrower was a last minute replacement to the mission to aid in Air Traffic Control procedures. He did not originally begin his career as a CCT, his roots in the Air Force started as an Air Traffic Controller and as an Instructor at Keesler. Another notable mission was TSGT Thrower’s control of the drop zone for Operation Junction City, the only paratrooper launch during the Vietnam War which landed 845 paratroopers behind enemy lines. TSGT Thrower was posthumously promoted and is buried at Ft Sam Houston National Cemetery,
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POSTED ON 11.12.2021
POSTED BY: Chuck Blankenship

Still Remembering My Uncle

My mother was your oldest sister {Mollie Marie). As a young boy, I still remember your visit to Pine Bluff just before you left for your last deployment to Vietnam and mom and others worrying and not wanting you to go but you said everything would be alright. Still remember the story of you and a buddy coming to your brother Woody's wedding in Dallas and picking up the pace of of the ceremony so everyone could get to the reception party! Still remember you telling me about your volunteering to be one of the first live dummies to be extracted from the ground using a plane with a hook (James Bond stuff). Mom and family will never forget you and the sacrifice you made for us and all Americans.
Thanks Unk!
Chuck Blankenship
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POSTED ON 2.16.2019

Final Mission of TSGT Fredrick L. Thrower

On September 4, 1967, a U.S. Air Force Fairchild C-123K Provider (#54-0621) from the 19th Air Commando Squadron had departed Bien Hoa Air Base on a flight to Nha Trang with an intermediate stop at Bao Loc Airfield. While on approach to Bao Loc, the pilot-in-command failed to realize his altitude was insufficient and the airplane struck the slope of a wooded mountain eleven miles southwest of the airfield. Eleven USAF personnel died in the crash. It was determined the accident was the consequence of a pilot error as he started the approach prematurely, causing the aircraft to descend below the minimum safe altitude. The lost crew included aircraft commander LTC Merle D. Turner, co-pilot CAPT Edward L. Goucher, and loadmaster A1C James R. Mayo; and passengers TSGT Jacklin M. Boatwright, MSGT Harold C. Cook, CAPT Virgil K. Kelley Jr., CAPT William B. Mahone, A1C Gerald L. Gauthier, A1C William E. Jerkins, MSGT Charles A. Paradise, and TSGT Fredrick L. Thrower. Mahone, Kelley, Boatwright, and Cook were an Operation Ranch Hand C-123 defoliant crew on their way to pick up their aircraft that had been repaired after battle damage. An aerial search located the aircraft on the side of a mountain. During the period of September 9-11, 1967, the 222nd Aviation Battalion conducted a recovery operation at the crash site with the recovery of remains and the destruction of the aircraft. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, baaa-acro.com, c123sinsea.org, and aviation-safety.net]
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