ERWIN B TEMPLIN JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 4E, LINE 83 OF THE WALL

ERWIN BENARD TEMPLIN JR

WALL NAME

ERWIN B TEMPLIN JR

PANEL / LINE

4E/83

DATE OF BIRTH

12/24/1940

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

01/22/1966

HOME OF RECORD

HOUSTON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Harris County

STATE

TX

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

LCDR

STATUS

MIA

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ERWIN BENARD TEMPLIN JR
POSTED ON 11.20.2019
POSTED BY: KR

LCDR Erwin B. Templin - POW/MIA Recognition Day 2019

The Department of Defense conducted a ceremony at the Pentagon on Friday, 20 September 2019 in recognition of POW/MIA Recognition Day. Deputy Defense Secretary David L. Nordquist remembered the 1,587 MIAs from the Vietnam War as well as all those still unaccounted for from WWII, the Korean War, the Cold War and other conflicts. Since the 2018 Ceremony, DPAA has positively identified 7 Vietnam War MIAs. LCDR Erwin Benard Templin Jr., USNA Class of 1963, is one of those 1,587 MIAs unaccounted for in Southeast Asia from the Vietnam War. He is one of 7 graduates from his U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis class who is still MIA. The other 6 USNA Class of 1963 MIAs are: 1) LCDR Kenneth Buell; 2) LCDR Charles Marik; 3) LTJG Donald MacLaughlin; 4) LCDR James Patterson; 5) LT Stanley Smiley; and 6) LCDR John Worcester. As of the date of this ceremony, there are 54 USNA graduates still MIA in SEA from the Vietnam War.

This is the link to the DoD story about the ceremony:

https://www.defense.gov/explore/story/Article/1967474/prisoners-of-war-missing-in-action-remembered-at-pentagon-ceremony/

This is the link to the C-Span video of the ceremony:

https://www.c-span.org/video/?464524-1/pentagon-hosts-national-powmia-recognition-day-ceremony
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POSTED ON 12.2.2017
POSTED BY: wkillian@smjuhsd.org

Final Mission of LCDR Edwin B. Templin Jr.

In the dead of night on January 22, 1966, a S-2 Tracker “Stoof” anti-submarine warfare aircraft launched from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV-12) with pilot LCDR William S. Forman and crew members LCDR Edwin B. Templin Jr., ADCS Robert R. Sennett, and AFCM Edmund H. Frenyea. Their mission was to investigate an unidentified radar contact. Their progress was under the advisory control of the destroyer USS Berkeley (DDG-15), and no unusual circumstances were reported. About 6:45 AM the USS Berkeley reminded the crew that their mission should be concluded shortly and they should return to the USS Hornet. Receipt of this information was acknowledged and it was reported that they had a surface contact and would investigate before departing the area. Shortly thereafter, the aircraft disappeared from the radar scope of the USS Berkeley. Their last known location according to coordinates was in the Gulf of Tonkin about half way between the coastal city of Thanh Hoa, North Vietnam, and the Chinese island of Hai Nan. Within a few hours of the disappearance, Radio Hanoi reported that an aircraft had been shot down near Bach Long Vi Island, North Vietnam. The last known location of the aircraft was about 30 miles from this island. After unsuccessful attempts to make radio contact, and unable to locate the aircraft on radar, search and rescue efforts commenced. LCDR Forman and his crew were reported as missing at sea. On February 1, 1966, the four-man life raft from the aircraft was found off the coast of North Vietnam approximately 152 miles from the last known position of the aircraft. The raft was identified by its serial number and bore no evidence of having been used and did not show any signs of damage by fire or gunfire. This particular raft is designed to automatically inflate when immersed in salt water. On March 14, 1966, a flight helmet was found by a friendly fishing junk and turned over to the U.S. authorities. This helmet was picked up in the same general area as where the life raft was located and has been identified as belonging to Bernard Templin. The four crewmen were later declared deceased under the Missing Persons Act on May 10, 1973. They all remain unaccounted for from the Vietnam War. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
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POSTED ON 5.29.2017
POSTED BY: K. H.

Remembering

On this Memorial Day, I am remembering you as I do from time to time as your name was also on my wrist for years until the bracelet broke. My heart breaks when I think of your sacrifice and that of so many others. Although I'm 60, your name comes to mind so easily. We must teach our children so they will always remember those who have gone before and those currently giving their all. I'm so appreciative and my prayers are with your relatives and friends.
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POSTED ON 4.29.2017
POSTED BY: Bernadette Krawczyk

In Memorium of another Navy Brother

My husband a navy DAV wore your MIA bracelet until it broke. He died on May 17, 2014. I waslooking through a memory box of his and came across that bracelet among other memorabilia in this box. I wiil keep that bracelet in your honor until I die then my son will keep it. When he passes it will be passed on to his sons. We must never forget your sacrafice. RIP
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POSTED ON 5.19.2016
POSTED BY: Dennis Cross (USNA 1962)

Annapolis and Houston

Skip and I were fellow midshipmen and good friends at the Naval Academy, and spent 1960 Christmas leave together in Houston, where in anticipation of the 1961 Orange Bowl Game we erected a giant "Go Navy Beat Missouri" banner on the grounds of the Shamrock Hotel. Unfortunately, the outcome of the game wasn't what we (or, I believe, President-elect Kennedy, who attended the game in person) had hoped for.
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