GERALD J SZOSZOREK
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HONORED ON PANEL 36W, LINE 38 OF THE WALL

GERALD JAMES SZOSZOREK

WALL NAME

GERALD J SZOSZOREK

PANEL / LINE

36W/38

DATE OF BIRTH

11/07/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

TAY NINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/17/1968

HOME OF RECORD

ERIE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Erie County

STATE

PA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR GERALD JAMES SZOSZOREK
POSTED ON 6.17.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp4 Gerald Szoszorek, Thank you for your service as a Heavy Vehicle Driver. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Another summer is soon. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 11.11.2021
POSTED BY: Rodolfo “Rudy” Hernandez

Zero was my best friend

Zero and I were each other’s best friends not just friends always together the day he died my truck was not loaded He was supposed to be riding shotgun with me I never missed a convy…the last time I saw Zero he was driving he decided to drive instead of being at shotgun wearing a steel pot flack jacket and smoking a cigarette with a new recruit and he was heading out on convy I waved at him but he did not see me..Zero was supposed to be home for Christmas …Zero has been part of my life ever since
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POSTED ON 3.30.2021
POSTED BY: James Szoszorek, USN, Ret.

Loving Brother

Think about you every day. Can't believe it's been almost 53 years.
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POSTED ON 3.31.2018

Final Mission of SP4 Gerald J. Szoszorek

On December 17, 1968, 39 vehicles of the 48th Transportation Group, in two March Units, departed Long Binh enroute to Dau Tieng on a normal resupply mission. Military police jeeps and tactical vehicles were interspersed among the convoy. Air cover was also provided. All Stake and Platform trailers (S&P’s) in the convoy were loaded with ammunition, while the 2 1/2-ton truck carried a load of potatoes. At 10:50 AM, on Route 239, approximately 5 miles west of Dau Tieng, the second March Unit began receiving approximately 15 rounds of 60mm and 82mm mortar fire. The first March Unit was not hit and continued to Dau Tieng unscathed. The terrain in the ambush area, although brush-filled with small rolling hillocks, was relatively open and did not seem a very likely location for an ambush. The 4th vehicle in the unit was hit by a mortar or RPG round (rocket-propelled grenade), causing the ammunition to burst into flames and setting the canvas cab top on fire. The driver, seeing that he could not drive the vehicle out of the kill zone because of the flames in the truck cab, moved forward as far as possible before running the vehicle off the right side of the road. He dismounted and took cover in a ditch on the left side of the road. Vehicles 5, 6, and 7 proceeded past the burning ammunition truck and made it safely to Dau Tieng. Vehicle 8 received a direct hit in the engine compartment from an unknown caliber round. It stopped the engine and wounded the driver, and he was unable to pull the vehicle completely off the road. The driver took cover in the ditch and was later evacuated to Dau Tieng. It is not known exactly what halted the remaining 5 task vehicles because five of the occupants were killed; three of the occupants were wounded and were evacuated. The original March Unit Commander’s Jeep broke down earlier and was being towed by a bobtail in the trail party; therefore, the commander and assistant were in the same Jeep, which was the last vehicle in March Unit 2. The Jeep was hit by an RPG round near the left front headlight but was only forced to stop when the 2 1/2-ton truck directly in front of it had stopped. All of the Jeep occupants dismounted and took cover as did the men in the 2 1/2-ton truck. However, it appeared that the 2 1/2-ton truck had been hit by something which wounded both men riding in the truck. Two of the Jeep occupants and one of the 2 1/2-ton truck occupants were subsequently killed. The enemy, estimated at battalion strength, was located on both sides and from 15 to 150 meters from the road, covering a 1200 meter kill zone. RPG, mortar, recoilless rifle, automatic weapons, and small arms fire were directed at the convoy. Approximately 2 minutes after the ambush was initiated, effective friendly artillery fire began to fall on enemy positions, and, within 12 minutes, at least one enemy mortar position had been knocked out. Gunships and tactical aircraft were employed against the enemy within a matter of minutes. Charlie Company, 2/22 Infantry, Bravo Company, 1/27 Infantry, and Bravo Troop, 3/4 Cavalry were rushed to the scene. Although the ambush element broke contact at about 1:00 PM, 25th Infantry Division units were able with supporting aircraft to maintain contact until 5:35 PM. A total of 2,171 rounds of artillery alone were fired in direct support of the convoy during the ambush. The 48th Transportation Group suffered seven men killed in action and five men wounded in the engagement. The seven lost Group members included SGT Richard G. Drake, 1LT James R. Hammersla, SP4 Thomas M. Kupiec, SP4 George W. Morton, PFC Frank N. Smith, PFC Robert F. Stockard, and SP4 Gerald J. Szoszorek. Stockard was posthumously promoted to Corporal. Six 5-ton tractors, six 12-ton S&P's, one 2 1/2 ton truck, and one jeep from 48th Group wore combat losses. Enemy losses were calculated at 52 KlA (by body count) and 59 KBA (killed by artillery [possible]). [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and Lessons Learned, Headquarters, 48th Transportation Group (Motor Transport), Period Ending 31 January 1969]
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POSTED ON 11.7.2017
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vetnam Veterans

Specialist Four Gerald James Szoszorek, Served with the 534th Transportation Company, 7th Transportation Battalion, 48th Transportation Group, United States Army Support Command (Saigon), 1st Logistical Command, United States Army Vietnam.
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