CLARENCE W STODDARD JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 10E, LINE 95 OF THE WALL

CLARENCE W STODDARD JR

WALL NAME

CLARENCE W STODDARD JR

PANEL / LINE

10E/95

DATE OF BIRTH

01/30/1927

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/14/1966

HOME OF RECORD

ATLANTA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Elmore County

STATE

ID

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

CDR

Book a time
Contact Details
STATUS

MIA

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR CLARENCE W STODDARD JR
POSTED ON 9.14.2003
POSTED BY: Donald Lytle

Thank you Commander Stoddard

Although we never met personally, I want to thank you Clarence W. Stoddard, Jr., for your continued vigilant and faithful service to this great country of ours!

Your Spirit is alive--and strong, therefore Sir, you shall never be forgotten!

Again, thank you Commander Clarence W. Stoddard, Jr., for a job well done!

MAYBE ONE DAY SOON.....UNTIL THEN.....HEAVENLY PEACE MY FRIEND


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POSTED ON 2.23.2003
POSTED BY: Candace Lokey

Not Forgotten

I have not forgotten you. I chair the Adoption Committee for The National League of Families of Prisoners of War and Missing in Action in Southeast Asia. We will always remember the 1,889 Americans still unaccounted for in Southeast Asia and the thousands of others that lost their lives. We will not stop our efforts until all of you are home where you belong.

We need to reach the next generation so that they will carry on when our generation is no longer able. To do so, we are attempting to locate photographs of all the missing. If you are reading this remembrance and have a photo and/or memory of this missing American that you would like to share for our project, please contact me at:

Candace Lokey
PO Box 206
Freeport, PA 16229
[email protected]

If you are not familiar with our organization, please visit our web site at :

www.pow-miafamilies.org
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POSTED ON 1.4.2002
POSTED BY: Jay Stone

The Skipper

Commander Stoddard was the Commanding Officer of VA-25, an A-1 Squadron aboard the USS Coral
Sea. He had been on a previous combat tour aboard the Midway. I was the Air Intelligence Officer assigned
the brief the missions to the squadrons flying over North VietNam. Cdr. Stoddard was an extremely
well-liked skipper and an outstanding pilot.

We arrived in the waters of the Gulf of Tonkin and one day later started combat missions. Since we had
several new pilots, the senior pilots with experience flew the first missions with junior guys as their wingmen.
Cdr. Stoddard was scheduled to do armed recon around the Thanh Hoa area and drop bombs on the rail
yard there if he found no suitable targets (trucks or barges). Since it was the first day in combat, they were
assigned relatively safe areas of North VietNam.

Before the flight, I briefed his group on their assignments, along with the enroute weather and the expected
resistance and flak. I remember that he said the that Thanh Hoa area was extremely well protected by AAA, and
that they would be careful around there. Since this was my first combat brief, I told him he could go whereever he
was comfortable going.

Several hours later, I was stunned by the announcement that he had been shot down. In debriefing his wingman
I found out that they had not found any trucks, so were going to Vinh, instead of Thanh Hoa to drop their
bombs. There was no previous intelligence, but the North Vietnamese had moved a Surface to Air
missle battery into Vinh where there had not been one before. During his attack, a missle was fired, Cdr.
Stoddard and his flight dove toward the water, but a missle scored a direct hit on his plane before he
could escape. The other planes airborne searched for him, but there was no parachute or anything in the water.

He was a real leader and his death brought the war directly to those of us who had been practicing,
but to whom the war didn't seem real until that day. We lost a lot of pilots over the next two years, but the one
I remember most was Commander Stoddard. I think he had four or five daughters and was a devoted
family man.
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