PHILLIP J STICKNEY
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (1)
HONORED ON PANEL 7E, LINE 129 OF THE WALL

PHILLIP JOSEPH STICKNEY

WALL NAME

PHILLIP J STICKNEY

PANEL / LINE

7E/129

DATE OF BIRTH

12/23/1937

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/31/1966

HOME OF RECORD

MANCHESTER

COUNTY OF RECORD

Hillsborough County

STATE

NH

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

SMS

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR PHILLIP JOSEPH STICKNEY
POSTED ON 1.6.2024
POSTED BY: John Fabris

do not stand at my grave and weep.....

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there. I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry;
I am not there. I did not die.
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.17.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear SMSgt Phillip Stickney, Thank you for your service as an Aircraft Loadmaster Tech. Your 56th anniversary is soon, sad. Glad you were identified in 2004. Welcome Home. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. The 47th anniversary of the last battle of the war just passed. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.28.2019
POSTED BY: Christina Frappier

Never forgotten about

I have had his MIA bracelet for over 30 years. If there is a family member that would like this please email me I will send it. I obviously have never met this true American hero but do think of him along with my father who also served in Vietnam. I also remember that my father survived Vietnam and served our country for 25 years in the USAF before passing away in 1995. He only told one story ever about his time there. I can only imagine the brotherhood these people had serving in Vietnam together knowing the experiences I had maintaining F-111's and F-15's for 8 years with some really great people. Thank you for your service SMS Philip J. Stickney
read more read less
POSTED ON 11.25.2018
POSTED BY: Patricia McAllister

Philip J Stickney

I have one of SMS Philip J Stickney's MIA bracelet for which I wore for several years. Thank you for your service and the sacrifice you made for your brothers and for our country. If any family member or organization would like this bracelet for their remembrance collection, please send your name and address and I will sent it to you
read more read less
POSTED ON 4.4.2017

Final Mission of A1C Phillip J. Stickney

At 1:10 AM on May 30, 1966, a USAF Lockheed C-130E Hercules (#64-0511) departed Da Nang Airbase on a tactical mission into North Vietnam. It was carrying several floating mass-focus bombs in an attempt to blow up the Thanh Hoa Bridge over the Song Ma River. The plan necessitated two C-130 aircraft dropping the weapon, a rather large pancake-shaped affair 8 feet in diameter and 2 1/2 feet thick and weighing 5,000 pounds. The C-130's would fly below 500 feet to evade radar along a 43-mile route (which meant the C-130 would be vulnerable to enemy attack for about 17 minutes), and drop the bombs, which would float down the Song Ma River where it would pass under the bridge and detonate when sensors in the bomb detected the metal of the bridge structure. The first attempt the previous night by a different C-130 crew had been unsuccessful. The second flight was by MAJ Thomas F. Case, whom had been through extensive training for the mission at Elgin AFB, Florida, and had been deployed to Vietnam only two weeks before. Operational necessity required minimum radio communications. At about two minutes prior to the scheduled C-130 drop time, F-4 fighters making diversionary attacks saw anti-aircraft fire and a large ground flash in the bridge vicinity. MAJ Case and his crew were never seen or heard from again. When a reasonable time had elapsed after scheduled down time, the aircraft and crew were officially declared Missing in Action. An intensive and continuing search was organized and launched involving over 16 aircraft and ships of the Air Force and Navy with negative results. The lost crew included pilot MAJ Case, co-pilot 1LT Harold J. Zook, navigators 1LT William R. Edmondson and 1LT Armon D. Shingledecker, flight engineer SSGT Bobby J. Alberton, weapon systems officer CAPT Emmett R. McDonald, and loadmasters A1C Elroy E. Harworth and A1C Phillip J. Stickney. To date, the remains of only three crewmen have been accounted for: Harold J. Zook, remains returned April 10, 1986; Thomas F. Case, remains returned February 1987; and Elroy E. Harworth, remains returned April 10, 1986. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and pownetwork.org]
read more read less
1 2 3