DONALD K SPRINGSTEADAH
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HONORED ON PANEL 44E, LINE 21 OF THE WALL

DONALD KENN SPRINGSTEADAH

WALL NAME

DONALD K SPRINGSTEADAH

PANEL / LINE

44E/21

DATE OF BIRTH

10/23/1932

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/11/1968

HOME OF RECORD

MILLVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Cumberland County

STATE

NJ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

TSGT

Book a time
Contact Details
STATUS

MIA

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DONALD KENN SPRINGSTEADAH
POSTED ON 3.4.2009
POSTED BY: Dave Avery

On Silver Wings

On Silver Wings
They Flew The Skies
These Brave Young Men
Who Fought And Died
When Duty Called
They Went So Brave
Now families Mourn
Beside Their Grave
Who Can Forget
What Courage They Had
Some Have,Some Did
And That's So Sad
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POSTED ON 12.9.2005
POSTED BY: CLAY MARSTON

AN ACCOUNT OF WHAT TOOK PLACE AT LIMA 85 ON 11 MARCH 1968



LIMA 85
Laos, 11 March 1968


LIMA 85 was the name of a TSQ-81 radar and TACAN site located in the mountains of Laos about 12 miles west of the Laos / North Vietnam Border border.

The TSQ-81 radar was used to provide flight following and navigation assistance for US aircraft operating in Laos and North Vietnam; the TACAN was (and remains) a standard radio navigation aid.

At the time LIMA 85 was established, Laos was officially neutral under the 1962 Geneva Accords.

The North Vietnamese government simply ignored the 1962 agreement and effectively exercised military control over large parts of Laos adjacent to the North Viet Nam, South Viet Nam, and Cambodian borders.

The United States government officially observed Laotian neutrality while unofficially attempting to respond to Laotian government requests for assistance.

The 1962 Accords prevented any open U. S. military presence in Laos, so the men assigned to operate LIMA 85 couldn't be military - yet only military personnel were trained in TSC-81 operations.

The answer was both simple and sneaky: US Air Force personnel were officially assigned to the 1043rd Radar Evaluation Squadron, Bolling Air Force Base, Washington DC, temporarily released from active duty, and "employed" by Lockheed as civilians.

The TSQ-81, TACAN, generators, prefab buildings, and other necessary equipment was provided by the United States Air Force and the site established on a 5860 foot high mountain called Phou Pha Thi. The site was protected on three sides by sheer cliffs.

Once in operation, LIMA 85 developed into a real thorn in North Vietnam's side - the high-resolution TSQ-81 radar allowed precision bomb drops by aircraft otherwise incapable of effective night/bad weather ground attack, while the TACAN supported accurate aircraft navigation.

The site was protected by a combination of Thai "mercenaries" and Laotian tribesmen loyal to the government - a total force of about 1,000 irregular troops.

In January 1968 the North Vietnamese attempted to destroy LIMA 85 by air attack in one of the very rare air operations conducted outside their own borders, the Peoples' Army of Vietnam (PAVN) Air Force used AN-2 Colts to bomb and strafe the site. While the attack was unsuccessful, it clearly illustrates the importance placed on destroying LIMA 85.

(NOTE: The PAVN Air Force Museum in Hanoi reportedly has a highly visible, detailed representation of the attack complete with a mock-up of the mountain, model AN-2 Colts, photos of the aircrew, and the gun pod from one of the AN-2 Colts).

In February 1968 it became evident that the NVN government intended to conduct a massive ground operation directed at capturing and destroying LIMA 85.

Ten PAVN battalions were identified moving toward and establishing base camps at the foot of Pha Thi mountain. The US Ambassador to Laos was responsible for deciding when the Americans manning LIMA 85 would be withdrawn - unfortunately, he left the decision undone for one day too long.

On 11 March 1968 the ground attack began and ended - by day's end the PAVN troops had assaulted through the fourth side of the site, the only approach not blocked by sheer cliffs, and had overrun the site.

US rescue efforts were only partially successful as eleven Americans were lost when LIMA 85 fell into enemy hands, and a twelfth was lost when his A-1E SKYRAIDER was shot down.

As of 06 November 2002, none of the twelve US Air Force men lost at LIMA 85 have been repatriated.

LTC Clarence Finlay Blanton

MSGT James Henry Calfee

SSGT James Woodrow Davis

SSGT Henry Gerald Gish

TSGT Willis Rozelle Hall

TSGT Melvin Arnold Holland

TSGT Herbert Arthur Kirk

A1C David Stanley Price

TSGT Patrick Lee Shannon

TSGT Donald Kenneth Springsteadah

SSGT Don Franklin Worley

CPT Donald Elliot Westbrook
( Shot down 13 Mar 1968 )


(( Last updated on 06 Nov 2002 ))



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POSTED ON 2.23.2003
POSTED BY: Candace Lokey

Not Forgotten

I have not forgotten you. I chair the Adoption Committee for The National League of Families of Prisoners of War and Missing in Action in Southeast Asia. We will always remember the 1,889 Americans still unaccounted for in Southeast Asia and the thousands of others that lost their lives. We will not stop our efforts until all of you are home where you belong.

We need to reach the next generation so that they will carry on when our generation is no longer able. To do so, we are attempting to locate photographs of all the missing. If you are reading this remembrance and have a photo and/or memory of this missing American that you would like to share for our project, please contact me at:

Candace Lokey
PO Box 206
Freeport, PA 16229
[email protected]

If you are not familiar with our organization, please visit our web site at :

www.pow-miafamilies.org
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POSTED ON 9.25.2000
POSTED BY: ch

NJ's own you are not forgotten.

I wore your bracelet until it snapped in half and fell from my wrist. When I visited the wall I cried for you.
Metal and stone cannot replace your presence.

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POSTED ON 6.5.2000
POSTED BY: Stephen Chopek

you are not forgotten

though we grew up at different times, we grew up in the same town and I lived accross the street from your sister, Betty Herr. I served at a different time then you but we both know what was lost in that war. I know your looking down on us and are proud that you fought for our freedom.
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