VERNON K SMOLIK JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 9W, LINE 129 OF THE WALL

VERNON KENNETH SMOLIK JR

WALL NAME

VERNON K SMOLIK JR

PANEL / LINE

9W/129

DATE OF BIRTH

07/13/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

TUYEN DUC

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/07/1970

HOME OF RECORD

TUCSON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Pima County

STATE

AZ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SGT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR VERNON KENNETH SMOLIK JR
POSTED ON 4.3.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sgt Vernon Smolik, Thank you for your service as an Executive Administrative Assistant with the 1st Cavalry. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is Spring , and Lent. Time moves quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 4.10.2019
POSTED BY: William B. Winkelman

Remembered By William Winkelman

I feel forever sad that you had to lose your life instead of enjoying a career as a promising 'cellist. You are a memory from some 49 years ago, but you are missed.
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POSTED ON 11.11.2018

Final Mission of SGT Vernon K. Smolik Jr.

On July 7, 1970, a U.S. Army helicopter UH-1H (tail number 69-15138) from the 11th Aviation Company (General Support), 1st Cavalry Division, was on an administrative flight when it crashed in bad weather in the mountains approximately 25 miles northwest of Bao Loc in Tuyen Duc Province, RVN. Seven U.S. personnel were killed in the incident. They included aircraft commander 1LT William F. Michel, pilot MGN George W. Casey, crew chief SGT Ronald F. Fuller, and gunner SGT William L. Christenson; also lost were passengers MAJ John A. Hottell III, SGM Kenneth W. Cooper, and SGT Vernon K. Smolik Jr. The helicopter was in a flight of two aircraft headed to Cam Ranh Air Base. MGN Casey, flight-qualified and at the controls of 138, intended to visit wounded members of his command convalescing at a medical facility there. After reporting their position 25 miles southwest of Dalat at 9:30 AM, the two helicopters turned through a hole in the clouds from an altitude of approximately 6500 feet. The chase ship, Aircraft 502, saw the ground at about 3500 feet as both helicopters continued descending. The descent was made into a valley with steep ridge lines and a river at the bottom. Aircraft 502 lost visual contact with Aircraft 138, then regained visual contact, then lost it again. Both aircraft went IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) after entering clouds. Aircraft 138 radioed 502 that he was IFR and doing a 180 degree turn and recommended that 502 do the same. This was the last known contact made with Aircraft 138. Aircraft 502 began climbing in order to return to VFR (Visual Flight Rules). Aircraft 502 broke out at 7000 feet, and running low on fuel, proceeded the approximately 15 to 20 minutes to Dalat. The lost Aircraft 138 was located two days later on a hillside near the Cambodian border approximately 25 miles northwest of Bao Loc. The crew compartment had been demolished on impact and destroyed in the post-crash fire. Bad weather delayed the recovery of the remains for four days until which time they were recovered and positively identified. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “Flying General, 6 on Missing Huey.” Pacific Stars & Stripes, July 11, 1970]
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POSTED ON 7.20.2018
POSTED BY: Bill Novak

Rest In Peace Dear Buddy

We’ve never forgotten you - high school classmate, classical musician, traveling buddy, college roommate, road rally partner and the guy who did so much to introduce me to classical music. Rest in eternal peace.
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POSTED ON 5.29.2017
POSTED BY: Paula M. Carson

In Loving Memory

God allowed us to share a life until He called you home on July 7, 1970. I miss you more than you can possibly know and 47 years does not make the pain any less bearable. You were dearly loved when you were alive and always will be. I will never stop loving you my dear brother.
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