MARK R BLACK
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HONORED ON PANEL 24E, LINE 108 OF THE WALL

MARK RYAN BLACK

WALL NAME

MARK R BLACK

PANEL / LINE

24E/108

DATE OF BIRTH

04/10/1945

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

08/14/1967

HOME OF RECORD

SWEETSER

COUNTY OF RECORD

Grant County

STATE

IN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

LCPL

Book a time
Contact Details
ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MARK RYAN BLACK
POSTED ON 1.20.2000
POSTED BY: Courtnie Black

My Uncle Mark loved to play with the Vietnamese children.

In his 25th tape recorded letter Aug, 4 1967 he said we asked about the Vietnamese kids & do I have any little friends. The kids here are dirty & they all need baths. They are constantly asking & begging for something which gets on our nerves, but they've got some [cute] kids here. They like to hang around you. If you get to be their friend they will grab hold of your hand or just hang on you, they like to talk to you. Just about all of them can speak some English. They know all the swear words! Four & five year olds smoke cigarettes. I have this one little friend, Lou, he's the one in the center of the picture. His mother does my laundry at a well over here, I give her soap to do it. The clothes come back all folded nice & neat. Just the other day I saw the kind of iron they use. It was a big shiny copper one & the top opened up to put hot coals inside, a little boy kept fanning it to keep the coals burning hot.
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POSTED ON 1.20.2000
POSTED BY: Marilyn Blacketor

Mark desribes how the typical Vietnamese lives.

A continuation of the June 15th letter. On our patrols we get thirsty & tired walking so we stop at a house & they ask us in & start serving us something to drink, usually tea & sometimes peanuts. They are very friendly to us. Their houses made of grass & thatched roofs aren't beautiful by any means. They are ugly, dirty, stinky & smelly, that's the way they live. There are no flowers $ no beauty. Chickens, dogs & sometimes pigs live in their house with them. They usually have 2 or 3 rooms. They sleep on a plank board up off the ground. In one corner on the ground is a little fire where they do their cooking. They are Buddhist & have a little alter where they give their offering every day. They use candles for their light at night. The Vill behind the compound here has about 10 houses & maybe 60 to 75 people live there.
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POSTED ON 1.19.2000
POSTED BY: Sherrie Black

Tribute to My Brave Uncle

In the tape recorded letter June 15,1967 he said the Vietnamese people don't appreciate anything we give them. They are always begging for something & it bugs us. We give them cigarettes & they sell them to the VC or black market & come back begging for more. They have a way of making you feel sorry for them so we end up giving them more. When the Corpsman gives a mamasan a bar of soap to bathe her dirty child she will go sell the soap. The PF's (popular forces) are little, short, skinny guys. If they see something we have & they want it they will steal it, so we have to keep all our gear locked up. I've never seen them do anything. They run around in uniforms like marines but they stay in the vills & the marines go out in the boon docks & do the fighting. They don't care about the war, they could care less. Some aren't worth a hoot & just aren't worth fighting for.
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POSTED ON 1.19.2000
POSTED BY: David Black, Jr.

My Uncle Mark talks Plain Truth.

In the June 27,1967 letter he said, "We, [the GRUNTS in C.A.C.P #3) were just talking today about how many men are over here. Of all the men here only about 20% do the actual fighting & the people back home are complaining that we've got more men here than we really need. They don't realize the V C out number us in the amount of fighting men (they] have. We have all these "office pogues" who set back in the rear and do nothing. They have beds to sleep in & get 3 meals a day. The air base at Da Nang has 6 PX's & a movie theater that runs all day (they are the ones that get to see all the USO shows). That's where most of these men are over here, there's very few of them out in the field doing the fighting so we are actually short handed. They need to get those guys out here on the front lines, throw a rifle in their hands & let them start "dingini".
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POSTED ON 1.2.2000
POSTED BY: Kim Jones

Served With Honor

Living in Sweetser. In., a small town of about a thousand people, during the 1950's and 1960's was a wonderful time. It was a life filled with all that is good which existed in small town America at that time. Mark was one of my heroes. He was seven years older than me. During Mark's career at Oak Hill High School he excelled at many sports. He was especially good at track. He was a pole vaulter and a long jumper. He was also an outstanding football player where he starred at the quarterback position. I always looked foward to going to all of the high school athletic events. Mark made me feel special when I was around him. When Mark got his first new car, a Ford Falcon, I happened to be visiting his home. H invited me to go for a ride. We headed north to show the car to one of his friends, Steve Fagan. Mark was so proud of that car. Later, after Mark finished barber college he went to work at his dad's shop. Once every two or three weeks I would visit Paul's shop to get my hair cut. The shop was always busy. Interesting characters and conversation were readily available. I will always remember with fondness seeing Mark at school activities, work, and the Sweetser United Methodist Church. I will have a place in my heart for Paul, Carol, David, and Mark. submitted by: Kim Jones-cousin
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