MARK R BLACK
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HONORED ON PANEL 24E, LINE 108 OF THE WALL

MARK RYAN BLACK

WALL NAME

MARK R BLACK

PANEL / LINE

24E/108

DATE OF BIRTH

04/10/1945

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

08/14/1967

HOME OF RECORD

SWEETSER

COUNTY OF RECORD

Grant County

STATE

IN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

LCPL

Book a time
Contact Details
ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MARK RYAN BLACK
POSTED ON 9.20.2009
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Mark is buried at Grant Memorial Park in Marion, IN.
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POSTED ON 10.3.2005
POSTED BY: Carol Black

Mother's Tribute to My Son

On the battle field of South Vietnam Mark courageously & patriotically offered his life. He was a dedicated athlete, Oak Hill graduate & a Master Barber before joining the Marine Corps Apr 29 1966, departing for Vietnam Oct 15 1966. He was faithful in sending home 89 written & 26 tape recorded letters telling his experiences & the actual [facts] & [truths] about the war. His love of action & dedication to God & his country made him a competent person & Marine who put forth his best effort in all he did. His last letter Aug 10 1967 said the war was all messed up, the "Big Wigs" have different stories, they don't know what's going on. They better start working to clean up this mess before we lose a lot of guys. Aug 15 1967 a telegram from the Government said Mark died of a gun shot wound to the chest the result of hostile rifle fire while on patrol.
August 14 1999 the 32nd Anniversary of his death.
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POSTED ON 10.3.2005
POSTED BY: Paul Black

Tribute to my Son

At the time of Marks death he was a member of a pacification team called "Combined Action Company" (C.A.C.) composed of 14 Marines & 15 to 30 S. Vietnamese soldiers. They lived together in a fortified compound beside the village of Cam Hieu, Cam Lo District, Quang Tri Province to secure the vill. Before joining the C.A.C. forces May 1967 he was engaged in 5 major operations, Deckhouse V, Prairie II, Chinook, Sparrow Hawk & Big Horn. His July 18 1967 letter said they had rolls of barbed wire around the compound with claymore mines in & around it & it would be almost impossible for the VC (Vietcong) to infiltrate unless it was an awful big unit. Each bunker had lots of ammo except mortars & a machine gun. Aug 14 1967 about 4:20 AM the compound was assaulted by some 150 N. Vietnamese soldiers. Early in the attack Mark was mortally wounded by small arms fire which struck him in the chest & death was immediate.
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POSTED ON 10.3.2005
POSTED BY: Mark Ryan Black II

My Uncle Mark - I know him only by the war pictures he sent back. I wasn't born yet when he died.

In Mark's Apr. 30, 1967 letter he said they didn't like the new M-16 weapons & explained why. They aren't reliable & jam to easy, his jammed 5 times. The round of fire won't eject & you have to use a ram rod & poke it out (just like the Daniel Boone guys did). Charlie Co was going to sweep through the VC & started firing at them, 17 of the rifles quit firing & they had 7 KIA's. The old M-14 would always fire, it would never malfunction. His May 31,1967 letter said they say the Pentagon is starting to investigate the M-16. He forgot what General said the only trouble was the [marines] because they didn't keep them clean. He said if that General was out in the front lines, in the boonies, brush, rice paddies, sand, dirt & water (sometimes over your head) he would find it impossible in combat to keep your rifle clean. The old M-14 could be in mud, sand, water all night & still fire & they would like to have them back.
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POSTED ON 10.3.2005
POSTED BY: David Black

Mark's own description of the terrible conditions of Marines in Combat.

Apr 15 1967 8 wks of humpin' hills, chopping thru thick jungle vines & digging holes every night because of mortars. The first night they got ambushed by gooks shooting down at them from the side of a hill. They kept walking & moving. The VC hid behind hedge rows to lob grenades over on them or set off controlled mines. It was so hot guys were passing out all the time, the only water was out of streams. They got hit by snipers. The gooks had them pinpointed for mortars in an open field with no cover. They called in artillery but it got so close to them they bad to call it off & retreat. They begin to carry back the dead & wounded & stayed there all night in the rain. The next day a chopper took the 20 WIA's, & the 9 KIA's were taken in on tanks. They hadn't eaten for 2 days, were worn out, muddy, wet & cold, it was still raining. Bodies about to fall off tanks started coming out of the ponchos, it was a terrible sight, really sickening. (Very condensed)
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