MICHAEL H BIA
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HONORED ON PANEL 60W, LINE 25 OF THE WALL

MICHAEL HOWARD BIA

WALL NAME

MICHAEL H BIA

PANEL / LINE

60W/25

DATE OF BIRTH

01/04/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

THUA THIEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/06/1968

HOME OF RECORD

WINDOW ROCK

COUNTY OF RECORD

Apache County

STATE

AZ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MICHAEL HOWARD BIA
POSTED ON 7.9.2003
POSTED BY: Patrick L. McMullen

HAASHCH' EETT'I (TALKING GOD)

IN BEAUTY MAY I WALK.
ALL DAY LONG MAY I WALK
THROUGH THE RETURNING
SEASONS MAY I WALK.
BEAUTIFULLY WILL I POSSESS AGAIN.
BEAUTIFULLY BIRDS...
BEAUTIFULLY JOYFUL BIRDS...

ON THE TRAIL
MARKED WITH POLLEN MAY I WALK.
WITH DEW ABOUT MY FEET MAY I WALK.
WITH BEAUTY MAY I WALK.
WITH BEAUTY BEFORE ME MAY I WALK.
WITH BEAUTY BEHIND ME MAY I WALK.
WITH BEAUTY ABOVE ME MAY I WALK.
WITH BEAUTY ALL AROUND ME
MAY I WALK.

IN OLD AGE WANDERING
ON THE TRAIL OF BEAUTY.
LIVING AGAIN, MAY I WALK.
IF IT IS FINISHED IN BEAUTY.
IT IS FINISHED IN BEAUTY.

*PRAYER, NIGHT WAY - - NAVAJO CEREMONIAL*


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POSTED ON 6.8.2002
POSTED BY: Larry P. Foster

Airborne Warrior

Michael rode his bull for eight seconds at the Navajo Nation Fair, he boxed for the Lee Damon's Boxing Team into the finals at the Silver Gloves championships at the Window Rock Civic Center and played football for the Window Rock Scouts.

He is our own Airborne Warrior, he fought for us, our Navajo Country, our sports and freedom. And, he left his family to be with the Great Creator.

You are a Airborne Warrior with the Holy People and Spirits.
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POSTED ON 5.11.2000
POSTED BY: Kenneth G. White, Jr.

A true Indian Warrior and Champion

Michael H. Bia served as a paratrooper in the 101st Airborne in Vietnam from April 1968 to June, 1968. He was my uncle and was married to my aunt Lula Bia in April of l968. He was a state champion track star and both a boxer and football player during his high school years at Window Rock High School in Fort Defiance, Arizona. After graduation, he continued to participate in the sport of rodeo, specializing in bullriding. Prior to his departure to Vietnam in the spring of 1968, he earned the title of All Indian Rodeo Cowboy Association Champion Bull Rider. At the young age of 21, during this turbulent time in America and in Vietnam, Michael had succeeded in winning this prestigious title among Native American cowboys by riding rank bulls and winning many rodeos throughout the Navajo Nation and surrounding areas.

Michael was a Navajo (Dine') Indian and was loved by all his family members. He was a kind and caring individual, with God given althletic skills in various sports. Although a recognized champion bull rider throughout the Navajo Nation, uncle Mike was unassuming in his mannerisms and dress, preferring to wear his faded wranglers, worn boots, and trusted hat, choosing to blend into the crowd, rather than being the center of attention. Yet, simultaneously, Michael had a great sense of inner pride in being a Native American and a sense of duty and responsibility to his people, land, and country. In contrast to his usual cowboy dress, when he wore his military dress uniform at his wedding to my aunt Lula, he looked like the most dignified and sharpest soldier in the armed forces.

Michael also had a great sense of humor, which he shared freely with friends and family. Indeed, he was both an honorable and humble humanitarian who cared for his wife, family, friends, and community in his special ways.

Although my uncle Mike was only 21, he truly left an enduring impact on all who knew him as a true champion of life. Today, he is buried at the Veteran's Memorial Cemetary in Fort Defiance, Arizona on the Navajo Nation.

In Michael's remembrance, there also is a Native American Church (NAC) tee pee grounds in White Cone, Arizona that is dedicated to his life and his ultimate sacrifice where family members continue to worship the Great Spirit and remember him to this day. The flag that was given to aunt Lula at uncle Mike's burial continues to fly proudly on the family flagpole at this memorial location during Native American Church ceremonies.

Michael's wife, Lula, recently was portrayed in a documentary film about the Vietnam War which focused on the personal impact the war had on the widows and families of American and Vietnamese soldiers who gave their lives in Vietnam. This touching film is called "Regret to Inform". Michael and Lula's lives are described in this documentary, which has been shown throughout the nation over the past several months. One of the film's overpowering messages is that Michael would want all Vietnam Veterans, especially Native American Vietnam Veterans, to be recognized and respected for the unending sacrifices they gave in service to their country.

Michael is survived by his wife Lula, son Michael Jr., and many family members who continue to respect,remember, and miss him to this day. Indeed, Michael was a true Indian warrior who sacrificed his precious life for his country, people, and land. His life is an example of all that is great in the human spirit and a wonderful testament of the tremendous impact one man can make in the lives of many, many people.
Every time I see the American flag nowadays, I think of my uncle and what he meant to me. Freedom is not free when wonderful human beings such as Michael have to give their lives for the rest of us to be free. God bless you Uncle Mike - walk in beauty with the Great Spirit forever.
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