MICHAEL H BIA
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HONORED ON PANEL 60W, LINE 25 OF THE WALL

MICHAEL HOWARD BIA

WALL NAME

MICHAEL H BIA

PANEL / LINE

60W/25

DATE OF BIRTH

01/04/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

THUA THIEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/06/1968

HOME OF RECORD

WINDOW ROCK

COUNTY OF RECORD

Apache County

STATE

AZ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MICHAEL HOWARD BIA
POSTED ON 1.30.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear PFC Michael Howard Bia, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 11.21.2010
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Michael is buried at Ft Defiance Cemetery, Ft Defiance,AZ. PH
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POSTED ON 8.20.2010
POSTED BY: Lulia M. Bia

Picture

Michael Howard Bia was a member of the Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. He was born January 4, 1947 and grew up on the Navajo Indian Reservation near Window Rock, Arizona. He was a brave warrior that was born into the Tachii'nii (The Red Running into the Water) Clan and born for the Totsohnii (The Big Water) Clan. Michael or "Mike," as he was known by many was a friendly and outgoing person. His sense of humor and sociable personality were appreciated by friends as well as family. One trait that everyone remembers is his smile. Mike's values and beliefs were grounded in traditional Dine Culture and worldview, and he was always respectful. Family was foremost in his life. As a young man, Mike assisted family with everyday chores that many typical Navajo families have to do, such as hauling firewood for warmth and cooking, filling water barrels for daily sustenance, and taking care of the home place in general. Mike was a natural athlete and fishing was one of his favorite past times. Also during his high school years, he excelled in track, football and rodeos. His rodeo career was at a high when he was drafted in the U.S. Army in 1968. Prior to leaving for his military service, he traveled across Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado participating in rodeo's "bull riding" event at which time he became very well known as "one of the best!" Rodeo was his passion that instilled in him a sense of pride, faith, and endurance. It made his love for family, people, and country even greater. This had an impact on a Vietnam Veteran, Chris Isaac, who in 1968 witnessed a cowboy tribute to Mike during the Navajo Nation Fair Rodeo after Mike was KIA. Mr. Isaac composed the poem "Michael Bia," which was published in Mr. Isaac's Cowboy Poetry book. Even after his passing, Mike has touched many lives and is remembered fondly to this day. He was married before departing for Vietnam to his high school sweetheart, "Louie." Although he never got to meet his unborn son, Mike Jr., his son got to know his father through family and friends' remembrances and stories. His wife Lulia and the entire family are so proud of Mike. He is forever our hero. He is our warrior that gave the ultimate sacrifice to protect our land, faith, and freedom. He left this earthly life giving us hope and dreams that one day there will be peace among all people. He is loved and remembered everyday. This short tribute is written with loving Remembrance and utmost respect by Lulia Bia, his wife and the Bia Family.
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POSTED ON 1.20.2009
POSTED BY: Gabriel Bia

Vietnam War Hero

Beloved son, brother, uncle,
and husband. After more than
40 years we still think of you often.
You will always and forever
be remembered.
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POSTED ON 6.4.2004
POSTED BY: Chris Spencer

NATIVE AMERICAN PRAYER

It is said a man hasn't died as long as he is remembered. This prayer is a way for families, friends and fellow veterans to remember our fallen brothers and sisters. Do not stand at my grave and weep I am not there, I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow, I am the diamond glints on snow. I am the sunlight on ripened grain, I am the gentle autumn rain. When you awaken in the morning hush, I am the swift, uplifting rush of quiet birds in circled flight, I am the stars that shine at night. Do not stand at my grave and cry, I am not there, I did not die
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