GEORGE M BEVICH JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 13E, LINE 9 OF THE WALL

GEORGE MICHAEL BEVICH JR

WALL NAME

GEORGE M BEVICH JR

PANEL / LINE

13E/9

DATE OF BIRTH

07/10/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

GIA DINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/04/1966

HOME OF RECORD

SUMMIT HILL

COUNTY OF RECORD

Carbon County

STATE

PA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

A2C

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR GEORGE MICHAEL BEVICH JR
POSTED ON 8.25.2011

Never Forgotten

Rest in peace with the warriors.
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POSTED ON 1.13.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

George is buried at St Joseph's Cemetery, Summit Hill, Carbon County,PA. SS PH
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POSTED ON 5.9.2007

George Michael Bevich

.
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POSTED ON 5.15.2006
POSTED BY: Don Graham

www.vspa.com

George, you will not be forgotten by your brother SP's
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POSTED ON 12.15.2003
POSTED BY: Jim McIlhenney

Families to Receive Medals of Valor for 2 Killed in Vietnam

Special to The Inquirer

MCGUIRE AIR FORCE BASE, N.J., March 15.-Two young air policemen who died repulsing a Vietcong attack on Tan Son Nhut Air Base in Saigon will be honored Thursday in ceremonies attended by their parents.
The Silver Star, the Nation's third highest award for valor, will be awarded posthumously to Airman 2-c John M. Cole, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Cole, of 113 Salaignac st., Philadelphia, and Airman 2-c George M. Bevich Jr., 22, whose father ia a retired coal miner in Summit Hill, Pa.

'THWARTED ATTACK'

The medals will be presented to the airman's parents by Brig. Gen. Roland J. Barnick, commander of the 438th Military Airlift Wing at McGuire.
The young men were credited with playing a key role in thwarting a surprise attack by the Communists on the Saigon air base last December 4.
In the attack, Cole was sent to a perimeter road in an attempt to trap the enemy. "Under greatly superior odds," his citation says, "he held his position and although fatally wounded, continued to ward off the attack."

VIETCONG TRAPPED

But his stand was successful. A Vietcong force was trapped while retreating from the base.
Cole was a 1964 graduate of Roxborough High School. His father is a tipstaff in Quarter Sessions Court.
Airman Bevich, on patrol duty with his dog, Rex, was the first to spot the Vietcong as they mounted the attack in the darkness.

'PREVENTED DIASTER'

He radioed word of his discovery and, according to his squadron commander, prevented "a major diaster to U.S. forces at Tan Son Nhut."
Bevich's last words were "I am moving in on them."
The squadron commander, Lt. Col. Grove C. Johnson, wrote, "There is no evidence that Airman Bevich even considered avoiding his attackers even though there was little he could do to stop the Vietcong advance, let alone survive the mission he had undertaken."

Article appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer on March 16, 1967.
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