STEVEN C ODOM
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (1)
HONORED ON PANEL 35E, LINE 78 OF THE WALL

STEVEN CRAIG ODOM

WALL NAME

STEVEN C ODOM

PANEL / LINE

35E/78

DATE OF BIRTH

06/02/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

01/30/1968

HOME OF RECORD

ATLANTA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Fulton County

STATE

GA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STEVEN CRAIG ODOM
POSTED ON 5.27.2021
POSTED BY: ANON

Never Forgotten

On the remembrance of your 72nd birthday, your sacrifice is not forgotten.

Forever 18.

Semper Fi, Marine
read more read less
POSTED ON 2.14.2021
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Steven Odom, Thank you for your service as a Rifleman. I researched you on your 53rd anniversary, sad. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Today is Valentine’s Day and tomorrow is Presidents’ Day. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
read more read less
POSTED ON 6.10.2020
POSTED BY: ANON

Never forgotten

Your birthday just passed, and your sacrifice is not forgotten.

Forever 18.

Semper Fi, Marine.
read more read less
POSTED ON 7.9.2018

Final Mission of PFC Steven C. Odom

At 7:45 AM on January 30, 1968, a Marine platoon from G Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines, was ambushed by approximately two companies or a reinforced company from the 31st North Vietnamese Army Regiment just below the Tuy Loan and Cau Do Rivers near the eastern bank of the Yen River in Quang Nam Province, RVN. G Company was conducting a search and destroy mission, patrolling along the banks of the Yen, when a heavy machine gun suddenly opened up on the point fire team. Firing from well-concealed and dug-in firing positions, the enemy machine gunners and infantry took a heavy toll on the Marines. With the enemy too close to call in artillery or fixed-wing air support, the Marines radioed for reinforcements. A second platoon from Company G arrived at the site and attempted to maneuver the NVA flank. The enemy then attacked, forcing the Marine platoons to fall back to more defensive positions. By 11:00 AM, Marine helicopters evacuated the most seriously wounded and brought in the rest of Company G into blocking positions on the western bank of the Yen. The Marines then counterattacked, supported by artillery and Marine gunships and fixed-wing aircraft. The North Vietnamese fought a delaying action as they began to withdraw. Later that afternoon, the 1st Marine Division heli-lifted a “Bald Eagle” reaction force from Company E, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines, east of the river in an attempt to close the circle around the NVA. Linking up, the two companies, under artillery and air cover, continued their advance until forced to halt because of darkness and then took up night defensive positions. The next morning, a sweep of the battle area by E Company, 2/3, and G Company, 2/3, revealed approximately 23 recently prepared fighting holes. Only two enemy bodies were recovered. However, there were multiple blood pools, blood trails, and drag marks. Assorted enemy gear left behind was collected. The area showed that U.S. artillery and air strikes had excellent coverage of target. Twelve Marines were lost in the engagement. They included LCPL Clifford R. Bennett, PFC Howard R. Bisjak, PFC Gary R. Carpenter, PFC Richard K. Drake Jr., PFC Cleveland Holmes, PFC Steven C. Odom, PFC Monte G. Pitner, PFC William J. Powers, PFC Kenneth A. Spilker, PFC Charles T. Tate Jr., and PFC Ronald E. Thompson. LCPL Gene D. Killgore died February 10, 1968, at the USAF Hospital in Tachikawa, Japan, where he had been evacuated for treatment of his injuries. One Marine listed as missing was recovered, and there was no loss of weapons or gear for any of the U.S. killed in action. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, “U.S. Marines in Vietnam: The Defining Year 1968,” and Command Chronology [7th Marines], January 1968]
read more read less
POSTED ON 4.4.2017
POSTED BY: David McDonald

A Tribute to a Friend and Hero

Steve was a friend and classmate in high school. All he wanted was to make a difference. He and I were not the most popular but loved the people we were around. He was so young at the time of his sacrifice. I believe that his and all those who sacrificed was not in vein. Even though things did not turn out well in the end, I do believe it helped stop the spread of communism in its tracks. I will always remember my friend.
read more read less