JOHN R OAKEY
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HONORED ON PANEL 8E, LINE 23 OF THE WALL

JOHN RUSSELL OAKEY

WALL NAME

JOHN R OAKEY

PANEL / LINE

8E/23

DATE OF BIRTH

12/06/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/08/1966

HOME OF RECORD

GRANTSVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Tooele County

STATE

UT

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JOHN RUSSELL OAKEY
POSTED ON 12.6.2023
POSTED BY: ANON

80

Your sacrifice is not forgotten.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 10.28.2023
POSTED BY: John Fabris

do not stand at my grave and weep.....

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there. I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry;
I am not there. I did not die.
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POSTED ON 2.9.2021
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp5 John Oakey, Thank you for your service as an Armor Reconnaissance Specialist. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is another cold winter day. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 8.19.2019

Final Mission of SP5 John R. Oakey

In June and July of 1966, the U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry Division conducted Operation El Paso II against the Viet Cong’s 9th Division in Binh Long Province, RVN. The object was to open national highway QL-13 and deter a VC offensive against the city of An Loc. On June 8th, Troop A, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry conducted a search and clear operation north of Ap Tau O bridge on QL-13. The convoy consisted of nine M48A3 tanks and twenty-seven M113's armored personnel carriers (APC’s), with a total of five officers and 128 men. They were ambushed by the 272nd Viet Cong Regiment which was deployed along a five-kilometer stretch of road in positions extending well beyond the length of the cavalry column. When the ambush was sprung, most of the American troopers were able to reach a small clearing near the head of the column, where, with the help of artillery and air support, they despertly fought off the Viet Cong for four hours. When the battle ended, the enemy had lost over one hundred dead with four taken prisoner. It was estimated that the bodies of a further 200+ enemy dead were carried away. Thirty individual and crew-served weapons were also captured. Although successful, the Cavalry had underestimated the size the VC force. Its supporting fire was used primarily against the Viet Cong in the fighting positions near the Cavalry force, allowing other enemy to freely maneuver and disable several tanks and APC’s. Although an infantry reaction force was committed toward the end, it did not arrive in time to be a decisive factor. Fifteen Americans died in the battle. They included PFC Roger L. Conner, SGT Donald E. Cook, SSG James I. Courtney, SSG Arthur W. Drynan, SGT Dewey L. Ferguson, SP4 Jorge L. Fernandez, SP5 John R. Oakey, PFC George R. Pendygraft, PFC Terrill G. Peterson, SSG Francis C. Rummel, PFC Michael A. Sharp, PFC Avery G. Smith, SP5 Phillip R. Smith, and SP4 Joseph Torzok. A U.S. Army UH-1B helicopter from the 1st Aviation Battalion piloted by MAJ Phillip H. Holmes in support of A Troop was hit by 12.7mm anti-aircraft fire. Holmes was wounded in the groin and died before he could be flown to the nearest hospital. Another nineteen Army of the Republic of Vietnam soldiers were also lost. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, wikipedia.org, and the book “Mounted Combat in Vietnam” (2002) by GEN Donn A. Starry and “Vietnam War: A Topical Exploration and Primary Source Collection by James H. Willbanks; also information provided by Gary A. Warne (August 2019)]
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POSTED ON 12.6.2018
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Specialist Five John Russell Oakey, Served with A Troop, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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